Marinated Bean Salad – Healthy Food Tip and Recipe


#AceRecipeNews – May 17 – Delicious and Healthy Food Tips From George

The World's Healthiest Foods
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healthy food tip and recipe
May 17, 2014
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A serving of 6 of the World’s Healthiest Foods can fulfill your entire day’s requirement for vitamin C! These include: papaya, bell peppers, broccoli, Brussels spouts, strawberries and pineapple. For a fresh look at Vitamin C from the perspective of food. Today’s RecipeIf you don’t know what to serve for dinner tonight …

This is a great dish to add to your Healthiest Way of Eating because you can keep in your refrigerator for 3-4 days and its flavor gets better each day!

Marinated Bean Salad

Marinated Bean Salad Prep and Cook Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 TBS minced onion
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 cups fresh green beans cut into 1-inch lengths
  • 2 cups or 1 15 oz can (BPA-free) lima beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups or 1 15 oz can (BPA-free) kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 large ripe fresh tomato, chopped
  • 2 TBS chopped fresh basil (or 2 tsp dried basil)
  • 1 TBS chopped fresh oregano (or 1 tsp dried oregano)
  • 1 TBS chopped fresh parsley (or 1 tsp dried parsley)
  • 3 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2-3 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Mince onion and press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out its health-promoting benefits.
  2. Fill the bottom of a steamer with 2 inches of water.
  3. While steam is building up in steamer cut green beans.
  4. Steam for 5 minutes. A fork should pierce them easily when they are done.
  5. Drain and rinse canned beans. Let beans sit in colander for another couple of minutes to drain excess water.
  6. Mix all ingredients together. If you have the time, let it marinate for at least 15 minutes. It can keep in the refrigerator for a few days. Keep on hand for a quick meal.

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In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Marinated Bean Salad

Healthy Food Tip

What does it mean to be healthy?

The dictionary defines health as the state of being free from illness, disease or injury. The World Health Organization defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

Here at the World’s Healthiest Foods our focus is on educating our readers how food and nutrition are essential for good physical health. Food is the key to life. It is the source of energy and essential nutrients that are required to sustain our bodies and prevent disease.

The word nutrition comes from a Latin root nutr-, which means to nurture or nourish. Nourishment is that which sustains life. Therefore, the science of human nutrition focuses on nourishing human life. From the moment of conception until death the body needs energy and nutrients to carry out vital functions such as breathing, digestion, metabolism, and every other physiological process in the body. Nutrition is thus the study of food; its nutritional components; the nutrient requirements of humans; and the means by which humans can maintain health and prevent disease through optimal nourishment from a healthy diet.

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If you have any questions about today’s Healthy Food Tip Ask George Your Question

What’s New on the Home Page This Week

New BookHow to Order The World’s Healthiest Foods, Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating. See sample pages and find out how to place an order for our new book. The special offer of free shipping is still in effect. We are already getting wonderful feedback which we want to share with you, so we’re posting it on the bottom of our home page. Enjoy the book and let us know how you like it.
I have using your book since last April and have been able to lose 25 pounds and now weigh below 150 which I haven’t seen in many years. I have also brought so many numbers in my blood work back into the normal ranges. I attribute much of this to relearning how to cook in a more healthy way! Thanks. I’ve ordered this book for 2 of my adult children. – Edith

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` Plastic Chemical `Azodicarbonamide ‘ found in nearly 500 foods and supplied by around 130 Companies’


#AceFoodNews says latest reports from EWG state that a `Plastic Chemical found in nearly 500 foods sold in US, by over 130 companies.

Nearly 500 food items commonly sold in the United States contain a chemical compound also used in synthetic leathers and yoga mats, but a health research and advocacy organization is aiming to change that.

azodicarbonamideFast-food chain restaurant Subway made headlines earlier this month when it announced that it would no longer be including that compound  azodicarbonamide or ADA — as a “dough conditioner” in the sandwich bread used in thousands of locations around the globe. But researchers at the Environmental Working Group say Subway isn’t the only guilty party, and that roughly 130 other companies mass-produce and sell an array of products that should have that chemical from their recipes as well.

According to a report released by that group on Thursday this week, consumers are just about as likely to find azodicarbonamide while at the grocery store as they would be inside a plastics factory. The Environmental Working Group, or EWG, has constructed a database containing the ingredients of 80,000 foods sold across the US, and say Subway shouldn’t be the only ones changing their recipes.

“This industrial plastics chemical shows up in many commercial baked goods as a ‘dough conditioner’ that renders large batches of dough easier to handle and makes the finished products puffier and tough enough to withstand shipping and storage. According to the new EWG Food Database of ingredients in 80,000 foods, now under development, ADA turns up in nearly 500 items and in more than 130 brands of bread, bread stuffing and snacks, including many advertised as ‘healthy,’” the report reads.

Among the suspect brands, the EWG report claims, are Ball Park, Butternut, Country Hearth, Fleischman’s, Food Club, Harvest Pride, Healthy Life, Jimmy Dean, Joseph Campione, Kroger, Little Debbie, Mariano’s, Marie Callendar’s, Martin’s, Mother’s, Nature’s Own, Pillsbury, Roman Meal, Sara Lee, Schmidt, Shoprite, Safeway, Smucker’s, Sunbeam, Turano, Tyson, Village Hearth and Wonder.

Environmental Working Group

Environmental Working Group (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“EWG recommends that consumers take steps to avoid the industrial additive ADA in their food. It is an unnecessary ingredient, its use has raised concerns about occupational exposure, and questions remain about its potential risk to consumers,” the group writes. “EWG also calls on all manufacturers to immediately end its use in food.”

Federal regulators, on the other hand, haven’t had a problem with ADA just yet. The US Food and Drug Administration has long approved the addition of ADA in consumable, as long as its presence doesn’t exceed 0.0045 percent of the weight of the flour used, as have the FDA’s Canadian counterparts. Elsewhere regulators have been more willing to hear out consumer concerns, however, and officials in Australia and the European Union have failed to give the okay to ADAs.

Soon that same anti-sentiment could become rampant in America: earlier this month US Senator Charles Schumer (D-New York) asked the FDA to ban ADAs altogether, and other fast-food chains have been pressured to stop using the chemical in the wake of the successful Subway petition that garnered more than 67,000 signatures from anti-azodicarbonamide advocates.

The FDA approved the chemical compound as being safe-in-moderation with regards to foods meant for human consumption back in 1962, but the banning 25 years later of another common dough conditioner — potassium bromate — has increased reliance on ADA ever since.

Despite being cleared as safe by the FDA, the World Health Organization has gone the record to say that epidemiological studies in humans and animals alike have produced “abundant evidence that azodicarbonamide can induce asthma, other respiratory symptoms and skin sensitization”

 

 

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` People in this World starve and others are `Obese’ as `Greed’ has its own Reward’s’


#AceHealthNews says `Child Obesity looms large, with over a third of `European’ teenagers over-weight in Europe – WHO-Reports’

Published time: February 27, 2014 19:46.47

 
Reuters / Toby Melville Reuters / Toby Melville
One in three 11-year-olds is overweight or obese across Europe, a detailed analysis on obesity levels in 53 countries has shown. Action needs to be taken “to stop overweight becoming the new norm,” the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned.

Up to 27 percent of 13-year-olds and 33 percent of 11-year-olds in some European countries are overweight or obese, according to the WHO latest report. It’s believed that lack of exercise, as well as the “disastrously effective”marketing of unhealthy foods, high in fat, sugar and salt, has led to a sharp rise in obesity and overweight in recent decades. Among the countries with the highest proportion of overweight 11-year-olds is Greece (33 percent), Portugal (32 percent), and Ireland and Spain (30 percent each).

From 2002 to 2010, the number of countries where more than 20 percent of 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds are overweight rose from 5 to 11. 

Over 30 percent of boys and girls aged 15 and over in 23 out of 36 countries are not getting enough exercise. Among adults, women’s rates of poor physical activity span from 16 percent in Greece to 71 percent in Malta and 76 percent in Serbia. 

Thanks to restrictions on advertising of unhealthy foods, promoting vegetable and fruit consumption and physical activity in schools, France, Norway, Switzerland and the Netherlands appeared among the few champions who managed to stem the epidemic of overweight and obesity, however. 

National governments should enforce legislation, and insist on informative labeling, nutrient profiling and regulated marketing, requiring the food industry to take responsibility, the WHO recommended in its report.

In Britain, where according to official statistics most people are overweight or obese, (this includes 61.9 percent of adults and 28 percent of children aged between two and 15), on average the population consumes too much saturated fat. Intakes of the so-called non-milk extrinsic sugars exceed the recommended level for all age groups, most notably for children aged 11-18, where mean intakes provided 15.3 percent of food energy, according to the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey.

The epidemic of overweight and obesity threatens children’s health, since childhood obesity goes hand in hand with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, orthopedic problems, mental disorders, under achievement in school, as well as lower self-esteem. 

“Preventing children from becoming overweight or obese is vital to their avoiding the associated, lifelong health risks,” the United Nations health agency said.

Over 60 percent of children who are overweight before puberty will be so as young adults. Such children are three to seven times more likely to be overweight adults. 

“Our perception of what is normal has shifted. Being overweight is now more common than unusual,” the WHO’s regional director, Zsuzsanna Jakab, pointed out. 

We must not let another generation grow up with obesity as the new norm,” she added. 

Physical inactivity “coupled with a culture that promotes cheap, convenient food high in fats, salt and sugars – is deadly,” Jakab warned. Children need at least one hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day not to gain extra weight.

“We need to create environments where physical activity is encouraged and the healthy food choice is the default choice, regardless of social group,” a WHO expert on nutrition, physical activity and obesity, Joao Breda, said in a statement released with the report. 

“Physical activity and healthy food choices should be taken very seriously in all environments – schools, hospitals, cities, towns and workplaces. As well as the food industry, the urban planning sector can make a difference,” he added. 

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century, the WHO says. Globally, in 2010 the number of overweight children under the age of five, is estimated to be over 42 million. Close to 35 million of those live in developing countries.

 

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#Chefs-tip: “Too Much White Sugar in your Diet can Cause Real Problems”


#AceFoodNews says very rarely do l recommend a #mustread post, but this one from the “Guardian” just needed to be posted.

United Nations World Health Organisation logo

United Nations World Health Organisation logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2012, the United Nations World Health Assembly advocated a significant new health goal: to reduce avoidable deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease kill 35 million per year. The UN has identified tobacco, alcohol and poor diet as central risk factors. The first two have been regulated by governments in order to protect public health, but poor diet is actually responsible formore disease than smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity combined.

But what component of the western diet should be targeted? The evidence suggesting that added sugar should be the target is now overwhelming. Unlike fat and protein, refined sugars offer no nutritional value and, contrary to what the food industry want you to believe, the body does not require any carbohydrate from added sugar for energy. Thus it is a source of completely unnecessary calories.

Sugars are added to the majority of processed foods in the UK. Yet disturbingly, many consumers are unaware of its presence in such large quantities. In the UK and Europe guideline daily amounts for sugar have not been updated since 2003. These obsolete guidelines still suggest one can consume a staggering 22 teaspoons of sugar daily.

World Health Organization Regions.

World Health Organization Regions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The World Health Organisation has recently been advised by scientific experts that added sugar or, more specifically, non-milk extrinsic sugar should constitute no more than 5% of energy. That would give a limit to the average man of a maximum of eight teaspoons a day and the average woman to six tea spoons a day. And that would include sugars fromfruit juice and honey.

The misleading labelling and health claims on “low-fat” foods that actually have shocking levels of sugar added is a scandal. Worse still, it has created the perfect storm for public health. Therefore, last Thursday, a group of UK and international experts, including myself, launched Action On Sugar. The main aim is to pressure the food industry to reduce added sugar in foods by 40% over four years. That would mean 100 fewer calories per person, which according to the UK Department of Health would reverse the obesity epidemic.

Health

Health (Photo credit: 401(K) 2013)

However, the industry remains in denial. Barbara Gallani, director of regulation at the Food and Drink Federation, made a statement of immediate resistance, denying sugar’s role in obesity and failing to acknowledge the multitude of scientific studies to the contrary. We mustn’t forget that it took 50 years from when the first scientific studies between smoking and lung cancer were made before any effective legislation was introduced through regulation. Why? Because Big Tobacco very successfully adopted a corporate strategy of denial. By planting doubt, confusing the public, bribing political allies and even buying the loyalty of rogue scientists.

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician an...

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician and Shadow Secretary of State for Health, speaking at the Health Hotel reception at the Manchester Central Conference Centre during the Conservative Party Conference 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The comparisons with the sugar industry are quite chilling. Leader of the Commons Andrew Lansley‘s aggressive intervention in parliament on Thursday was thus intriguing. He attempted to rubbish respected public health expert Professor Simon Capewell’s statement that sugar is the new tobacco. Lansley then compounded his errors by ignorantly asserting in the House that “sugar is essential to food”. It is not. He would have been more accurate in saying “sugar is essential to food industry profits and lining the pockets of its co-opted partners”. Lansley was a paid director of marketing company Profero to the end of 2009. Profero’s clients have included Pepsi, Mars, Pizza Hut and Diageo’s Guinness.

During his unhappy time as health secretary, Lansley promoted his brainchild, the Responsibility Deal. There, he invited fast-food companies in for cosy discussions on how to tackle obesity, cynically generating the impression of progress, but only achieving weak and meaningless voluntary calorie reduction pledges.

The food industry spends billions in junk food and sugary drink advertising, targeting the most vulnerable members of society, including children. Worse, the industry cynically associates fitness and sport with junk food and sugary drinks. Thus Mars is one of the official sponsors of the England football team. Yet one regular sized bar contains eight teaspoons of sugar, almost triple the amount recommended as a limit for a four- to eight-year-old child by the US Department of Health and Human Services’ dietary guidelines. The commonest cause of chronic pain in children is tooth decay with sugar as the number one risk factor. Regular physical activity has a multitude of health benefits; however, its effect on sustained weight loss is often weak. Furthermore, activity levels have changed little in the past 30 years as obesity has rocketed.

We are all vulnerable, because you don’t have to be overweight to be affected by diet-related disease. Of all the chronic diseases, type 2 diabetes, which is entirely preventable, is perhaps the most damaging. Diabetes increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, eye disease and leg amputations. Up to half of all diabetic patients go on to suffer acute or chronic pain, and two-thirds will ultimately develop dementia. The direct and indirect costs to the UK of diabetes is over £24bn and projected to approach £40bn by 2030. If we do nothing, this will cripple the NHS.

How does sugar compare to tobacco? A teaspoon of sugar or one cigarette will not harm you. But over time, the habit can be fatal. Unlike Big Tobacco, Big Sugar deliberately targets children. And added sugar has become so pervasive within the food environment that we can’t avoid it even if we wanted to. It is thus not simply a matter of personal choice. But perhaps most disturbing of all the similarities is the financial and political muscle that both industries have exerted to try to protect their profits, at the expense of our health. It’s time to wind back the harms of too much sugar, reverse the “diabesity” epidemic and the unspeakable suffering it causes. It’s time for Action On Sugar.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a London cardiologist, is the science director of Action on Sugar

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

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