SUGAR: ‘ Not Good for US but We Consume it Like an Addictive Drug ‘


#AceFoodNews – UNITED STATES – September 16 – Sugar is not good for you we are told, but as humans we are truly addicted to it – from fizzy drinks and over sweet foods to burgers and beans.

'White V Brown or Healthy V Unhealthy Ask Our Chef '

‘White V Brown or Healthy V Unhealthy Ask Our Chef ‘

They all YES all contain sugar and the white-stuff is worst:

Take a look at this link and compare White (Refined) with Brown (Unrefined) 

Larry Schwartz who is a Brooklyn – based freelance writer with a focus on health, science and nutrition says:

Sugar is as addictive as cocaine. Brain scans after sugar consumption, are very similar to when we do blow. Dopamine floods the brain and, boy, do we feel good. And of course it is a lot easier on the nostrils…unless you’re snorting your sugar… Hello. My name is Larry, and I’m a sugar addict.

So what does a poor American do? We can start by being conscious of the sugar we are consuming. The stuff comes in many disguises. It’s like the Peter Sellers of ingredients. Sugar, cane juice, cane syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, fruit juice concentrate, honey, molasses, malt syrup. Those are its favourite masks. If we are at least aware of what we are chowing down or chugging, we have a fighting chance. Increase the water intake, decrease the soda intake. Check out the ingredients on the labels. Opt for reduced sugar products. Awareness is a good start. As Daniel Lieberman said: “We need to realize that our bodies are not adapted to the amount of sugar that we are pouring into them and it’s making us sick.”

So what l here you say – my life well here are some of Larry’s statistics:

How badly do we crave sugar? Here are (some of) the shocking statistics:

1. Americans consume, on average, 765 grams of sugar every five days. To put that in perspective, in 1822 we consumed on average 45 grams every five days. That is equal to one can of soda. Now we consume 17 times that, or the equivalent of 17 cans of soda.

2. Americans consume 130 pounds of sugar every year. Our 1822 predecessors ate under 10 pounds of sugar a year. 130 pounds a year means about three pounds a week. That equals about 3,550 pounds in an average lifetime—approaching two tons of sugar.

3. More on that last one: 130 pounds of sugar equals about 1,767,900 Skittles. Or just fill an industrial a dumpster with Skittles.

4. The American Heart Association recommends we consume less than 10 teaspoons of sugar a day. The average adult American misses that mark by a lot. Like about 12 teaspoons. The average American gobbles down on average 22 teaspoons a day. And the average child? 32 teaspoons. Pretty sure none of us needs that much to make the medicine go down. Mary Poppins, it seems, was an enabler.

5. Our sugar consumption is both in plain sight and hidden, ingested from the most unlikely places. Sugar in cookies seems obvious. Sugar in potato chips not so much. And ketchup and TV dinners and soup and crackers and just about every other processed food out there. Who are the biggest baddies? Soft drinks lead the list at 33% of our sugar consumption (drink water instead of coke and you have already made a huge dent). Candy and other obvious sweets, 16%. Baked goods like cookies and cakes, 13%. Fruit drinks 10%. Sweetened yoghurt, ice cream and milk almost 9%.

6. One can of Coke, 12 ounces, contains 10 teaspoons of sugary goodness. That’s more sugar than two Frosted Pop Tarts with a Twinkie thrown in.  

7. The average American consumes 53 gallons of soda a year. Let’s do the maths. 128 ounces in a gallon times 53. That’s 6,784 ounces. Or just to simplify it, that’s 565 cans of soda a year.

8. If you took away all the sugar in an average American diet, you would subtract 500 calories a day. Of course, since we are not taking it away, that means sugar adds 500 calories a day to our diet (and waistlines). That is like eating 10 strips of bacon a day. Even bacon-loving Americans might stop short of that.

9. So, given all the bad stuff: Diseases, bad teeth, expanding waistlines. Zero nutrition. Why do we keep consuming sugar? Well, there is that DNA connection.

Sugar is how we are wired for energy, but evolution never took processed sugar into account.

Sweets eaters survived because they ate more energy-efficient fruit and veggie sugar that metabolises slowly and does not kill us.

Maybe worth considering ………. before the next sugary drink or …… maybe not!!!

AFHN2014

#Chefs-tip: “Too Much White Sugar in your Diet can Cause Real Problems”


#AceFoodNews says very rarely do l recommend a #mustread post, but this one from the “Guardian” just needed to be posted.

United Nations World Health Organisation logo

United Nations World Health Organisation logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2012, the United Nations World Health Assembly advocated a significant new health goal: to reduce avoidable deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease kill 35 million per year. The UN has identified tobacco, alcohol and poor diet as central risk factors. The first two have been regulated by governments in order to protect public health, but poor diet is actually responsible formore disease than smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity combined.

But what component of the western diet should be targeted? The evidence suggesting that added sugar should be the target is now overwhelming. Unlike fat and protein, refined sugars offer no nutritional value and, contrary to what the food industry want you to believe, the body does not require any carbohydrate from added sugar for energy. Thus it is a source of completely unnecessary calories.

Sugars are added to the majority of processed foods in the UK. Yet disturbingly, many consumers are unaware of its presence in such large quantities. In the UK and Europe guideline daily amounts for sugar have not been updated since 2003. These obsolete guidelines still suggest one can consume a staggering 22 teaspoons of sugar daily.

World Health Organization Regions.

World Health Organization Regions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The World Health Organisation has recently been advised by scientific experts that added sugar or, more specifically, non-milk extrinsic sugar should constitute no more than 5% of energy. That would give a limit to the average man of a maximum of eight teaspoons a day and the average woman to six tea spoons a day. And that would include sugars fromfruit juice and honey.

The misleading labelling and health claims on “low-fat” foods that actually have shocking levels of sugar added is a scandal. Worse still, it has created the perfect storm for public health. Therefore, last Thursday, a group of UK and international experts, including myself, launched Action On Sugar. The main aim is to pressure the food industry to reduce added sugar in foods by 40% over four years. That would mean 100 fewer calories per person, which according to the UK Department of Health would reverse the obesity epidemic.

Health

Health (Photo credit: 401(K) 2013)

However, the industry remains in denial. Barbara Gallani, director of regulation at the Food and Drink Federation, made a statement of immediate resistance, denying sugar’s role in obesity and failing to acknowledge the multitude of scientific studies to the contrary. We mustn’t forget that it took 50 years from when the first scientific studies between smoking and lung cancer were made before any effective legislation was introduced through regulation. Why? Because Big Tobacco very successfully adopted a corporate strategy of denial. By planting doubt, confusing the public, bribing political allies and even buying the loyalty of rogue scientists.

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician an...

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician and Shadow Secretary of State for Health, speaking at the Health Hotel reception at the Manchester Central Conference Centre during the Conservative Party Conference 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The comparisons with the sugar industry are quite chilling. Leader of the Commons Andrew Lansley‘s aggressive intervention in parliament on Thursday was thus intriguing. He attempted to rubbish respected public health expert Professor Simon Capewell’s statement that sugar is the new tobacco. Lansley then compounded his errors by ignorantly asserting in the House that “sugar is essential to food”. It is not. He would have been more accurate in saying “sugar is essential to food industry profits and lining the pockets of its co-opted partners”. Lansley was a paid director of marketing company Profero to the end of 2009. Profero’s clients have included Pepsi, Mars, Pizza Hut and Diageo’s Guinness.

During his unhappy time as health secretary, Lansley promoted his brainchild, the Responsibility Deal. There, he invited fast-food companies in for cosy discussions on how to tackle obesity, cynically generating the impression of progress, but only achieving weak and meaningless voluntary calorie reduction pledges.

The food industry spends billions in junk food and sugary drink advertising, targeting the most vulnerable members of society, including children. Worse, the industry cynically associates fitness and sport with junk food and sugary drinks. Thus Mars is one of the official sponsors of the England football team. Yet one regular sized bar contains eight teaspoons of sugar, almost triple the amount recommended as a limit for a four- to eight-year-old child by the US Department of Health and Human Services’ dietary guidelines. The commonest cause of chronic pain in children is tooth decay with sugar as the number one risk factor. Regular physical activity has a multitude of health benefits; however, its effect on sustained weight loss is often weak. Furthermore, activity levels have changed little in the past 30 years as obesity has rocketed.

We are all vulnerable, because you don’t have to be overweight to be affected by diet-related disease. Of all the chronic diseases, type 2 diabetes, which is entirely preventable, is perhaps the most damaging. Diabetes increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, eye disease and leg amputations. Up to half of all diabetic patients go on to suffer acute or chronic pain, and two-thirds will ultimately develop dementia. The direct and indirect costs to the UK of diabetes is over £24bn and projected to approach £40bn by 2030. If we do nothing, this will cripple the NHS.

How does sugar compare to tobacco? A teaspoon of sugar or one cigarette will not harm you. But over time, the habit can be fatal. Unlike Big Tobacco, Big Sugar deliberately targets children. And added sugar has become so pervasive within the food environment that we can’t avoid it even if we wanted to. It is thus not simply a matter of personal choice. But perhaps most disturbing of all the similarities is the financial and political muscle that both industries have exerted to try to protect their profits, at the expense of our health. It’s time to wind back the harms of too much sugar, reverse the “diabesity” epidemic and the unspeakable suffering it causes. It’s time for Action On Sugar.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a London cardiologist, is the science director of Action on Sugar

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

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” Twelve Night Cake”


#AceFoodNews says bake a historical recipe of a “Twelve Night Cake” from the days of yore, to complete your #ChristmasFayre and ending your festivities on the 12th Evening in preparation for the 6th January and commencing the “Day of Epiphany” 

Twelfth Night Cake Recipes

Bake A Historical Epiphany Cake

Twelfth Night Cake For Celebrating Epiphany Festivities

Properly celebrate Epiphany by using these authentic Twelfth Night cake recipes to make exquisitely decorated Twelfth cakes. The festival of Epiphany to celebrate the manifestation of the Christ to the Magi, or wise men, occurs on January 6th, the twelfth day after Christmas.

From the Medieval Era to about the mid 1800s, Epiphany or Twelfth Night was celebrated more than Christmas Day in England. It was a traditional time for extinguishing the yule log and the partaking of Wassail.

As a climax to the various festivities, an ornate Twelfth Night cake was prepared and ceremoniously served at the evening feast of Twelfth Night. Whoever found the lucky, baked-in bean was declared king for the day.

Other traditionally symbolic items to be found in the rich, dense fruitcake might be a pea (for the queen), a clove (for the villain), a rag (for the tart), and a twig (for the fool).

Now, thanks to these old-fashioned Christmas dessert recipes, you can introduce this enjoyable, age-old tradition to your holiday gathering.

Rich-Tasting Twelfth Night Cake Recipes

This authentic Twelfth cake recipe was once used commercially by the renowned English confectionery cook, Robert Wells of Scarborough. It is curated from “The Bread and Biscuit Baker’s and Sugar-Boiler’s Assistant” by Robert Wells, published by Crosby Lockwood and Son, London, in 1890.

Twelfth Night Cake:

1-1/4 lb of flour, 1 lb 2 oz of butter, 1 lb of moist sugar, 4 lb of currants, 1-1/2 lb of mixed peel, 2 nutmegs grated, 1/2 oz ground cinnamon, 10 eggs, 1/2 lb blanched sweet almonds cut in halves, and a wineglassful of brandy.

London Way of mixing Cakes:

Weigh down the flour and sugar on a clean smooth table, make a hole in it, and bank it well up; in this hole put your eggs; cream the butter in an earthenware pan; then add to the flour and sugar the eggs and butter; mix all together and beat up well with both hands. You may work it up this way as light as a feather; then add the currants, spices, etc.

In olden times, a bean and a pea were introduced into the cake to determine who should be the king and queen of the evening festivities.

Icing Recipe For Twelfth Cakes, Bride Cakes, Etc.

To make this take 2 lb of finely powdered icing sugar (first having an earthenware pan made warm), put in six fresh whites of eggs, and immediately whisk them, and as quickly as possible, until quite stiff; then add the sugar by degrees, whisking all the time. As soon as it appears light cease whisking, and beat it well with the spatter until you have put in all the sugar. A little tartaric acid or lemon juice may be added towards the end of the mixing.

To know when it is sufficiently beaten, take up a little on the spatter and let it drop into the basin again. If it keeps its shape it is ready; if it runs it is either beaten too little or requires more sugar.

Parkinson’s Twelfth Night Cake Recipe

This old-fashioned recipe for what was sometimes called an Epiphany cake is curated from “The Complete Confectioner, Pastry-Cook, and Baker” by Eleanor Parkinson, published by J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, in 1864.

Rich Twelfth, Pound Cakes, Or Bridle Cakes:

Butter two pounds twelve ounces, sugar one pound twelve ounces, currants five pounds, citron one pound and a-half, almonds six ounces; nutmegs, mace, and cinnamon, of equal parts, in powder, two ounces; eggs twenty, brandy half a pint — these proportions allow for the cake being iced.

If more sugar is preferred, the quantity must be the same as the butter; but less is used in this instance, that the cake may be light, and also to allow for the fruit, which would make it too sweet. Double the quantity of almonds may be used if required, as some persons prefer more.

Warm a smooth pan, large enough for the mixture; put in the butter, and reduce it to a fine cream, by working it about the pan with your hand. In summer the pan need not be warmed, as it can be reduced to a cream without; but in the winter keep the mixture as warm as possible, without oiling the butter. Add the sugar and mix it well with the butter, until it becomes white and feels light in the hand.

Break in two or three eggs at a time, and work the mixture well, before any more is added. Continue doing this until they are all used and it becomes light; then add the spirit, currants, peel, spice, and almonds, some or most of these being previously cut in thin slices, the peel having also been cut into small thin strips and bits. When these are incorporated, mix in the flour lightly; put it in a hoop with paper over the bottom and round the sides, and placed on a baking plate.

Large cakes require three or four pieces of stiff paper round the sides; and if the cake is very large, a pipe or funnel, made either of stiff paper or tin, and well buttered, should be put in the center, and the mixture placed round it; this is to allow the middle of the cake to be well-baked, otherwise, the edge would be burnt two or three inches deep before it could be properly done.

Place the tin plates containing the cake on another, the surface of which is covered an inch or two thick with sawdust or fine ashes to protect the bottom. Bake it in an oven at a moderate heat. The time required to bake it will depend on the state of the oven and the size of the cake.

When the cake is cold, proceed to ice it. (See icings for cakes below.) Wedding Cakes have generally, first, a coating on the top of almond icing; when this is dry, the sides and top are covered with royal or white icing. Fix on any gum paste or other ornaments whilst it is wet; and when dry, ornament it with piping, orange blossoms, ribbon, etc.; the surface and sides are often covered with small knobs of white sugar candy whilst the icing is wet.

Twelfth Cakes are iced with white or colored icing, and decorated with gum paste, plaster ornaments, piping paste, rings, knots, and fancy papers, etc., and piped.

Icing Recipe For Twelfth Night Cakes

Pound, and sift some treble-refined sugar through a fine sieve, and put it into an earthen pan, which must be free from grease; to each pound of sifted sugar add the whites of three eggs, or sufficient to make it into a paste of a moderate consistence, then with a wooden spoon or spatula beat it well, using a little lemon juice occasionally, and more white of egg if you find that it will bear it without making it too thin, until you have a nice light icing, which will hang to the sides of the pan and spoon; or, if it is dropped from the spoon, it should remain on the top without speedily losing the form it assumed.

A pan of icing, when well beat and finished, should contain as much again in bulk as it was at the commencement: use sufficient lemon juice to give the icing a slight acid, or it will scale off the cake in large pieces when it is cut.

Easy Twelfth Night Cake Recipe:

This historic recipe is curated from the book “Mrs. Goodfellow’s Cookery As It Should Be” by Mrs. Elizabeth Goodfellow, published by T. B. Peterson & Brothers, Philadelphia, in 1865.

Cream two pounds of butter and two pounds of sifted loaf sugar; take one large nutmeg grated, half an ounce of ground allspice, one teaspoonful of ground cinnamon, the same of ginger, the same of coriander seeds, and one wineglass of brandy; mix these well, then beat very light eighteen eggs; cut into thin slices half a pound of citron, and the grated rind of two lemons; beat this for at least half an hour until perfectly light; line the pan with buttered white paper, and bake in rather slow heat for four hours: when nearly cold, ice it as directed.

The Epiphany of the Magi

Illustration of Madonna and Child

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod, the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, saying, “Where is he that is born King of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.”

And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary, his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him; and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts: gold, frankincense, and myrrh. —Book of Matthew 2: 1-2, 11

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#AceRecipeNews says Observe the traditional twelve days of Christmas at your house this year by celebrating Epiphany on January 6th, with a special cake made using these authentic Twelfth Night cake recipes.

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