‘Obesity Campaigners Still Waiting to Ban Drink Sizes ‘


#AceFoodNews – NEW YORK CITY – June 05 – New York City took its fight to limit the size of sodas and other sweet drinks blamed by some for obesity back to an appeals court, AFP said.

The regulation, spearheaded by former Mayor Michael Bloomberg in May 2012, has been opposed by big business, including restaurant chains, movie theatres and soda makers.

They say the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene overstepped its authority on the measure.

The legislation aims to limit personal sweet drink sizes to 47 centilitres in stadiums, stores and fast food restaurants.

Just hours before the regulation was to take effect in March 2013, a judge ordered it blocked, calling it “capricious and arbitrary.”

Many drinks that are high in calories are not included, and the ban does not cover supermarkets or other food stores.

Then in July 2013, a local appeals court upheld that ruling.

But new Mayor Bill de Blasio said he would try to appeal once more.

Lawyers working on the case stressed that these were drinks with “empty calories.” A decision is expected from the court within one to three months.

In New York City, 58 percent of the population is either obese or overweight.

AFP

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` GM Advisory Report to David Cameron from Group of Scientists allegedly linked to the `Biotech Industry ' suggest approval for Commercial Cultivation '


#AceFoodNews There is no evidence that GM crops are more dangerous than conventionally farmed food, a group of scientists allegedly linked to the biotech industry have advised UK PM David Cameron.

Critics say the group is funded by the GM lobby.

In an advisory report to David Cameron issued Friday, senior scientists suggest that approval for commercial cultivation of new GM crops within the EU should be made at a national level, as it is now with pharmaceuticals.

“This would safeguard against potential losses and damage to European agriculture that follow from the failure to adopt GM crops, and enable appropriate regulation of new technologies such as genome editing and synthetic biology for crops,” the report says.

According to one of the authors of the document, technology for making crops healthier and more environmentally friendly is developing fast.

Therefore, “the regulatory system needs to change to allow us to take advantage of this benefit sooner,” Reuters reported Jonathan Jones, a GM expert at Britain’s Sainsbury Laboratory, as saying.

Claire Robinson, editor at campaign group GMWatch, told The Guardian that these scientists’ views should be treated with the same skepticism we would apply to a sales pitch because they are not independent of the biotech industry.

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