“The Canadian Food Experience Project – Pudding Chomeur – A French Canadian Delight”


#AceFoodNews says another #AceGuestNews and Views post and recipe, this time a “French Canadian Delight” from the pen of Author: Lyndsay Wells who is a professional trainer, writer, and program developer with a passion for food and cooking. She is an award-winning recipe developer, and a website ambassador for Kraft Foods Canada. Lyndsay believes cooking should be approachable and easy and has great tips and ideas for putting together sophisticated looking dishes that cooks of all levels can accomplish.

#AceGuestViews at her YouTube Channel or at her daily on her blog, The Kitchen Witch.

Recipe and Extract:

I experienced Pudding Chomeur or “Poor Man’s Pudding” at the home of my friend Raymonde about 12 years ago. The occasion was a book club dinner that brings a group of dear friends together once a month to discuss a book, share a glass or two of wine, and enjoy what is always a memorable feast.
We’ve got together since October, 1998 and our very first book was “She’s Come Undone” by Wally Lamb. I served dinner at my place – roast beef with Yorkshire Puddings and my mom’s recipe for apple crisp.In the years since, we’ve read well over 150 books and have added new recipes to our cook’s arsenals – like today’s recipe for Pudding Chomeur for the Canadian Food Experience Project.When I tasted this family recipe passed down from Raymonde’s mother in Gerrardville Quebec, I knew this traditional dish was going to become my family’s Christmas dessert – and it also proves my theory that the very best recipes are the old time ones.

This fudgy, gorgeous masterpiece is so simple to put together and is made with ingredients most people always have on hand – but when served hot with a big dollop of vanilla ice cream it’s as good a dessert as any I’ve had in the best restaurants.

If you’ve never tried Pudding Chomeur, I hope this post will inspire you to give it a go and, I promise, you won’t be disappointed!

Please enjoy my easy to follow step by step video.
The printable recipe can be found here: Pudding Chomeur

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Bake Time: 35 minutes
Serves: 6

Sauce Ingredients 

  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • 1 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • Boil for two minutes

Cake Ingredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp shortening or butter
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1/3 cup milk

Directions

  1. Beat all the cake ingredients together and put in the bottom of greased square 8×8 cake pan.
  2. Pour the sauce evenly over top of the cake. Bake at 350 for 35 minutes. The sauce will turn to a creamy fudgy layer onthe  bottom of cake. Slice and scoop with a spatula making sure to get lots of caramel sauce.
  3. Serve warm with ice cream.

Cooks Note
The recipe can be made the day ahead and then re-heated for ten minutes at 350 just before serving.

Cookery Hints and Tips From The Cradocks


English: portrait of Fanny Cradock

English: portrait of Fanny Cradock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

An elegant woman is seen squeezing a bright yellow substance through an icing tube creating carnations and putting them on the plate. Carnations are just another way to serve butter – colour it with some harmless food dye and squeeze it through the icing tube on a little cube of bread shaping a flower. Excellent!

Famous husband and wife cooking team, Fanny and John Cradock, are showing some of the ways to serve savouries. Presentation of the food is as important as the food itself.

Next come swans made of hard-boiled eggs. Two thin slices are cut off vertically at each side of the egg. Then, a pipe cleaner is shaped into S and placed on top of the egg creating swan’s long neck and head. Two cut pieces are ‘glued’ back to the sides with mashed potato (or cream). Mrs Cradock places the swan with the other swans – on the plate covered with chopped parsley.

John Cradock scoops small cheese balls to place them on a plate as flower petals. With a bit of butter in the middle and couple of real mint leaves they look very nice – almost too nice to eat.

And finally, Mrs Fanny Cradock shows the audience how to ‘sculpture’ an orange into a basket and some other decorative things. Story ends with C/U of a plate with different decorative things made of oranges.

Note: the Cambridge Biographical Encylopedia states the correct spelling of Fanny and John’s surname as ‘Cradock’. For search purposes the alternative spelling is ‘Craddock’.

Chefs Editorial:

So l hope you enjoy taking a look at the video courtesy of  British Pathe News and some of the old ways of doing things in those days, like Van Dyke with orange baskets ,something l had to learn when l trained as a chef!  Also just love those swans with use of pipe-cleaners! Brings back memories of how we use to cook!

Enjoy, more soon, when time!

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/cookery-hints-aka-cooking-tips/query/wildcard

Please remember the use of any of these materials are copyrighted by British Pathe News for preview only click on the link: British Pathe News and it will take you to the video, it is not that long so well worth seeing!