Recipe: ‘ Homemade Honey Lemon Cough Drops with Ginger ‘


#AceRecipeNews – Nov.15 – Featured Blog Post: Homemade Honey Lemon Cough Drops with Ginger

November 14, 2014 1 Comment

‘Tis the season…it seems like now that Winter is here, everyone is coughing, hacking, sniffling and sneezing.

http://www.thankyourbody.com/recipe-homemade-honey-lemon-cough-drops-ginger/

Author: Permacooking

Reducing food waste can be eco-friendly, easy, and delicious.

15-Minute Sauteed Fennel Salmon – Healthy Food Tip and Recipe


#AceRecipeNews – May 17 – Sauteed Fennel Salmon

The World's Healthiest Foods
The George Mateljan Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising, is a new force for change to help make a healthier you and a healthier world.
healthy food tip and recipe
May 16, 2014
Check Out What’s New On Our Website
A serving of 6 of the World’s Healthiest Foods can fulfill your entire day’s requirement for vitamin C! These include: papaya, bell peppers, broccoli, Brussels spouts, strawberries and pineapple. For a fresh look at Vitamin C from the perspective of food. Today’s RecipeIf you don’t know what to serve for dinner tonight …

This is a great way to enjoy fennel. The flavor of the fennel wonderfully complements the rich taste of salmon for a complete meal that takes only 15 minutes to prepare!

15-Minute Sautéed Fennel Salmon

15-Minute Sautéed Fennel Salmon Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 lbs salmon fillet, cut into 8 pieces, skin and bones removed
  • 1 TBS + 1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 large fennel bulb sliced thin, save 1 TBS chopped green tops to use for garnish
  • 2 TBS fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • salt and white pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Season salmon with a little salt and white pepper. Set aside.
  2. Heat 1 TBS broth in 10-12 inch stainless steel skillet. Healthy Sauté fennel bulb in broth over medium heat for 1 minute stirring constantly.
  3. Add 1/4 cup broth, lemon juice, pinch salt and pepper, and place salmon on top.
  4. Reduce heat to low and cover. Cook for about 5 minutes. Do not overcook fennel, or it will lose its flavor. Sprinkle with chopped green fennel tops. Adjust seasoning to taste and serve.

Serves 4 Serving Suggestions: Serve with

  • Pureed Sweet Peas

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Healthy Food Tip

Why is it that iron, and calcium are considered nutrients that cancel one another out, but actually occur in high content, together, in leafy greens?

Studies on human subjects have shown that calcium can inhibit iron absorption, regardless of whether calcium is consumed in the form of a supplement or as a part of the food matrix. Importantly, research studies don’t show significant changes in indicators of iron status in individuals with high calcium intakes over long periods of time. Therefore, the inhibitory effect on iron absorption may be of short duration and/or there are likely mechanisms in place that allow the body to conserve iron stores or compensate for this interaction.

The mechanism for the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption is not completely understood. Some research suggests the interaction is an intestinal absorption event that occurs at the cellular membrane level; however, it is also possible that the inhibition occurs during iron transfer into circulation.

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If you have any questions about today’s Healthy Food Tip Ask George Your Question

What’s New on the Home Page This Week

New BookHow to Order The World’s Healthiest Foods, Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating. See sample pages and find out how to place an order for our new book. The special offer of free shipping is still in effect. We are already getting wonderful feedback which we want to share with you, so we’re posting it on the bottom of our home page. Enjoy the book and let us know how you like it.
I have using your book since last April and have been able to lose 25 pounds and now weigh below 150 which I haven’t seen in many years. I have also brought so many numbers in my blood work back into the normal ranges. I attribute much of this to relearning how to cook in a more healthy way! Thanks. I’ve ordered this book for 2 of my adult children. – Edith

Visit our homepage at http://whfoods.org

Copyright © 2014 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

George Mateljan Foundation, PO Box 25801, Seattle, Washington 98165

 

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Marinated Bean Salad – Healthy Food Tip and Recipe


#AceRecipeNews – May 17 – Delicious and Healthy Food Tips From George

The World's Healthiest Foods
The George Mateljan Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising, is a new force for change to help make a healthier you and a healthier world.
healthy food tip and recipe
May 17, 2014
Check Out What’s New On Our Website
A serving of 6 of the World’s Healthiest Foods can fulfill your entire day’s requirement for vitamin C! These include: papaya, bell peppers, broccoli, Brussels spouts, strawberries and pineapple. For a fresh look at Vitamin C from the perspective of food. Today’s RecipeIf you don’t know what to serve for dinner tonight …

This is a great dish to add to your Healthiest Way of Eating because you can keep in your refrigerator for 3-4 days and its flavor gets better each day!

Marinated Bean Salad

Marinated Bean Salad Prep and Cook Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 TBS minced onion
  • 3 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 cups fresh green beans cut into 1-inch lengths
  • 2 cups or 1 15 oz can (BPA-free) lima beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups or 1 15 oz can (BPA-free) kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 large ripe fresh tomato, chopped
  • 2 TBS chopped fresh basil (or 2 tsp dried basil)
  • 1 TBS chopped fresh oregano (or 1 tsp dried oregano)
  • 1 TBS chopped fresh parsley (or 1 tsp dried parsley)
  • 3 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2-3 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Mince onion and press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out its health-promoting benefits.
  2. Fill the bottom of a steamer with 2 inches of water.
  3. While steam is building up in steamer cut green beans.
  4. Steam for 5 minutes. A fork should pierce them easily when they are done.
  5. Drain and rinse canned beans. Let beans sit in colander for another couple of minutes to drain excess water.
  6. Mix all ingredients together. If you have the time, let it marinate for at least 15 minutes. It can keep in the refrigerator for a few days. Keep on hand for a quick meal.

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Healthy Food Tip

What does it mean to be healthy?

The dictionary defines health as the state of being free from illness, disease or injury. The World Health Organization defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

Here at the World’s Healthiest Foods our focus is on educating our readers how food and nutrition are essential for good physical health. Food is the key to life. It is the source of energy and essential nutrients that are required to sustain our bodies and prevent disease.

The word nutrition comes from a Latin root nutr-, which means to nurture or nourish. Nourishment is that which sustains life. Therefore, the science of human nutrition focuses on nourishing human life. From the moment of conception until death the body needs energy and nutrients to carry out vital functions such as breathing, digestion, metabolism, and every other physiological process in the body. Nutrition is thus the study of food; its nutritional components; the nutrient requirements of humans; and the means by which humans can maintain health and prevent disease through optimal nourishment from a healthy diet.

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If you have any questions about today’s Healthy Food Tip Ask George Your Question

What’s New on the Home Page This Week

New BookHow to Order The World’s Healthiest Foods, Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating. See sample pages and find out how to place an order for our new book. The special offer of free shipping is still in effect. We are already getting wonderful feedback which we want to share with you, so we’re posting it on the bottom of our home page. Enjoy the book and let us know how you like it.
I have using your book since last April and have been able to lose 25 pounds and now weigh below 150 which I haven’t seen in many years. I have also brought so many numbers in my blood work back into the normal ranges. I attribute much of this to relearning how to cook in a more healthy way! Thanks. I’ve ordered this book for 2 of my adult children. – Edith

Visit our homepage at http://whfoods.org

Copyright © 2014 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

George Mateljan Foundation, PO Box 25801, Seattle, Washington 98165

 

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` Too Much Salt and Sugar is Bad for You so What do you Replace it with as a Substitute – One Person's View '


#AceFoodNews – BRITAIN – April 11 – (BBC) – The white stuff you sprinkle on your food is back in the headlines. Whether it’s salt or sugar, it seems many of us may be consuming too much. So how easy is it to live without processed food for a week? Helen Briggs finds out.

Sunday

The first day of my new regime involves rifling through kitchen cupboards to see what I’m permitted to eat. The definition of processed food varies, but according to the US Food and Drug Administration it comprises:

Any food other than a raw agricultural commodity and includes any raw agricultural commodity that has been subject to processing, such as canning, cooking, freezing, dehydration or milling.
So out with pasta, oil, tinned tomatoes and many other staples.

Unlimited fruit and vegetables are an easy option, along with the humble baked spud.

But what about protein? I don’t eat meat so that means soaking and cooking my own lentils and chickpeas, rather than buying them tinned.

Read More and the other Days http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-26560558

#AF&HN2014

#Chef-tips ” Preparing Soy Sauces”


#AceFoodNews says here is my latest health food tip, it true that the traditional methods of preparing and consuming soy are greatly disregarded today?

In many Asian traditions, soybeans have always undergone processes of fermentation and aging before they have been consumed. Soy sauces, soy curds (made into tofu), soy pastes (made into miso), and other soy products like tempeh have all been traditionally produced through methods that take time and revolve around the ability of microorganisms (mostly “friendly bacteria” that are very desirable inhabitants of our digestive tract) to convert the cooked soybeans into a more digestible, nutrient-rich, and health-supportive food.

I’ve seen studies, for example, comparing soy foods fermented with the bacterium Bifidobacterium to non-fermented soy foods. In these studies (conducted on mice) the fermented foods were able to support the skin and connective tissue of the animals (by increasing the production of a substance called hyaluronic acid) in a way that the non-fermented products were not. Two phytoestrogens (called genistein and daidzen) were also found to be present in the fermented foods but not detectable in the non-fermented versions.

Research has clearly shown that soy proteins become more digestible with fermentation. A significant percentage of soy proteins get broken down into shorter protein strands (called polypeptides) or even into single amino acids during the process of fermentation. These protein forms require less chemical activity in our digestive tract and are much better prepared for digestion than whole, intact proteins.

I’ve also seen studies that examined traditional fermentation process used to make soy sauce (shoyu), and these studies suggest that the antioxidant properties of soy sauce and the potentially cancer-preventive properties of soy sauce are both related to the process of fermentation.

In addition, these studies show that the risk of allergy to soy is decreased through the process of fermentation. This conclusion makes sense to me, because many food allergies involve our immune system’s response to food proteins, and the proteins in soy are clearly changed during the fermentation process.

From a manufacturing standpoint, however, there are challenges with traditional fermentation methods for soy. Proper fermenting takes time, adds complexity to production, and may not match with existing consumer expectations in terms of texture or taste. Lengthy fermentation processes may also bring a cost factor into production. Preservation of unique characteristics in the final food product can also be an issue.

The majority of soy products in the marketplace today is not fermented and therefore would be expected to lack the unique health benefits provided by soy foods that have been prepared using traditional fermentation methods.

While there appear to be special health benefits from the consumption of traditionally fermented soy foods, non-fermented soy foods can still make a very nourishing contribution to your diet. We definitely like some of the unique health-supporting aspects of fermented soy foods (and other fermented foods as well), but we encourage you to consider all types of whole soy products and their great potential for improving health and nourishment.

(Please note that we prefer organic soybeans and foods made from them since they are not grown from genetically modified seeds.)

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` People in this World starve and others are `Obese’ as `Greed’ has its own Reward’s’


#AceHealthNews says `Child Obesity looms large, with over a third of `European’ teenagers over-weight in Europe – WHO-Reports’

Published time: February 27, 2014 19:46.47

 
Reuters / Toby Melville Reuters / Toby Melville
One in three 11-year-olds is overweight or obese across Europe, a detailed analysis on obesity levels in 53 countries has shown. Action needs to be taken “to stop overweight becoming the new norm,” the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned.

Up to 27 percent of 13-year-olds and 33 percent of 11-year-olds in some European countries are overweight or obese, according to the WHO latest report. It’s believed that lack of exercise, as well as the “disastrously effective”marketing of unhealthy foods, high in fat, sugar and salt, has led to a sharp rise in obesity and overweight in recent decades. Among the countries with the highest proportion of overweight 11-year-olds is Greece (33 percent), Portugal (32 percent), and Ireland and Spain (30 percent each).

From 2002 to 2010, the number of countries where more than 20 percent of 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds are overweight rose from 5 to 11. 

Over 30 percent of boys and girls aged 15 and over in 23 out of 36 countries are not getting enough exercise. Among adults, women’s rates of poor physical activity span from 16 percent in Greece to 71 percent in Malta and 76 percent in Serbia. 

Thanks to restrictions on advertising of unhealthy foods, promoting vegetable and fruit consumption and physical activity in schools, France, Norway, Switzerland and the Netherlands appeared among the few champions who managed to stem the epidemic of overweight and obesity, however. 

National governments should enforce legislation, and insist on informative labeling, nutrient profiling and regulated marketing, requiring the food industry to take responsibility, the WHO recommended in its report.

In Britain, where according to official statistics most people are overweight or obese, (this includes 61.9 percent of adults and 28 percent of children aged between two and 15), on average the population consumes too much saturated fat. Intakes of the so-called non-milk extrinsic sugars exceed the recommended level for all age groups, most notably for children aged 11-18, where mean intakes provided 15.3 percent of food energy, according to the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey.

The epidemic of overweight and obesity threatens children’s health, since childhood obesity goes hand in hand with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, orthopedic problems, mental disorders, under achievement in school, as well as lower self-esteem. 

“Preventing children from becoming overweight or obese is vital to their avoiding the associated, lifelong health risks,” the United Nations health agency said.

Over 60 percent of children who are overweight before puberty will be so as young adults. Such children are three to seven times more likely to be overweight adults. 

“Our perception of what is normal has shifted. Being overweight is now more common than unusual,” the WHO’s regional director, Zsuzsanna Jakab, pointed out. 

We must not let another generation grow up with obesity as the new norm,” she added. 

Physical inactivity “coupled with a culture that promotes cheap, convenient food high in fats, salt and sugars – is deadly,” Jakab warned. Children need at least one hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day not to gain extra weight.

“We need to create environments where physical activity is encouraged and the healthy food choice is the default choice, regardless of social group,” a WHO expert on nutrition, physical activity and obesity, Joao Breda, said in a statement released with the report. 

“Physical activity and healthy food choices should be taken very seriously in all environments – schools, hospitals, cities, towns and workplaces. As well as the food industry, the urban planning sector can make a difference,” he added. 

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century, the WHO says. Globally, in 2010 the number of overweight children under the age of five, is estimated to be over 42 million. Close to 35 million of those live in developing countries.

 

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Publishing nutrition information on menus helps people make healthier choices, study finds


#AceFoodNews says `What a Great Idea’ #chefs-tips

National Post | News

When the Ottawa Hospital decided to prominently display nutritional information for its cafeteria meals, the resulting labels created some awkward moments. The sky-high sodium levels of certain items, now available for all to see, were downright “embarrassing,” recalls an outside researcher.

But the up-front listing of calorie, fat and salt content succeeded in catching the attention of most customers, and actually led to reduced and healthier eating, concluded a study of the program, the first of its kind in Canada.

The federally funded research adds to a simmering debate over what and how much customers should be told about their restaurant meals.

The results suggest that publishing nutrition information on menus and menu boards — rather than providing it more discreetly on request or over the Internet, as industry favours — can trigger concrete changes in behaviour, said David Hammond, the University of Waterloo public-health professor who headed the study.

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#Chefs-tip : “Healthy Eating Bok Choy Recipe”


#AceRecipeNews says a little used and rarely tired is”Bok Choy” abd it is good and full of nutrition, so thought a simple 4 minute, recipe is in order.

Enjoy this great tasting recipe and get 375% of your Daily Value for vitamin A, 318% DV for vitamin C, 188% DV for vitamin K and 69% for folate!

4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy Prep and Cook Time: 10 minutesIngredients:

  • 1 lb bok choy, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 3 TBS low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 drops soy sauce
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional:
  • 1 TBS grated ginger
  • 2 TBS tofu, cubed
  • toasted sesame seeds

Directions:

  1. Chop bok choy and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health-promoting properties.
  2. In a stainless steel heat broth. When it begins to steam add bok choy and healthy saute, Healthy Sauté for 4 minutes.
  3. Toss with garlic, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste and any of the optional ingredients you would like to include.

Serves 2

Nutritional Profile

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
(280.93 grams)
Calories: 218
NutrientDRI/DV
 vitamin A337.8%
 vitamin C141.3%
 vitamin K90.2%
 folate37.7%
 vitamin B627.6%
 calcium24.2%
 manganese19.5%

Introduction to Recipe Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify recipes that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Recipe Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the recipes that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the recipe doesn’t contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this recipe’s in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients – not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good – please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you’ll need to glance back up to see the ingredients used in the recipe and the number of serving sizes provided by the recipe. Our nutrient ratings are based on a single serving. For example, if a recipe makes 4 servings, you would be receiving the nutrient amounts listed in the chart by eating 1/4th of the combined ingredients found in the recipe. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this recipe and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration‘s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
280.93 grams
Calories: 218
Nutrient Amount DRI/DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
vitamin A 10134.87 IU 337.8 27.9 excellent
vitamin C 106.04 mg 141.4 11.7 excellent
vitamin K 81.19 mcg 90.2 7.4 excellent
folate 151.00 mcg 37.8 3.1 good
vitamin B6 0.47 mg 27.6 2.3 good
calcium 242.59 mg 24.3 2.0 good
manganese 0.39 mg 19.5 1.6 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%
very good DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%
good DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy

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#Chefs-tip ” Meat Is Difficult to Digest – Especially for the Elderly”


#AceFoodNews says l receive a number of interesting articles everyday ,but checking them out l find a lot are not as good as they seem. Those that read my posts will know l try to provide best advice. Anyway here is one that l had sent to me to print. It is courtesy of George Matejlan and his Foundation.

MeatSimply called:

Meat:

In comparison to many other foods, yes, meat can be difficult to digest. Meat is protein-dense animal muscle, and, in comparison to many other foods, for optimal digestion it requires better chewing, more acid secretion by the stomach’s parietal cells, and more active enzyme secretion by the pancreas. None of these factors mean that meat consumption should be avoided, however. Low-fat meats can make excellent additions to a meal plan, if eaten in moderation, even though many individuals choose to avoid meat for a variety of different reasons. I should also note here that fat itself can be difficult to digest, and you will be complicating your digestive challenges if you choose to eat meat that is higher in fat.

I’d encourage special attention to chewing in the case of meat, as well as to the cutting of the meat into small, bite-sized pieces. The overnight marinating of meat in an acid-containing marinade (for example, a marinade containing vinegar) can also increase its digestibility. In the hospital, when a person’s digestive system is particularly weak, meat is almost always blended or pure’ed to make it easier to digest. While few of us would want to go that far in improving meat’s digestibility, the idea of special attention to small bites and thorough chewing follows this same basic principle of improved digestibility.

Some people require meat and animal-based foods as part of their diet in order to maintain their optimal health, while others do not. If you are going to eat meat, eating it in small amounts may be wise in terms of allowing for optimal digestion. Additionally, I would highly suggest seeking out organically raised meats (and dairy products), when possible, as these do not contain residues of compounds, such as hormones and other drugs, which may be present in their conventionally raised counterparts.

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