FDA: ‘ Declares artificial Trans-Fat threat to Public Health ‘


#AceFoodNews – July.27: After years of hemming and hawing, the Food and Drug Administration has finally declared artificial trans fat a threat to public health, giving food companies until June 2018 to phase out partially hydrogenated oils, the primary source of trans fat in processed foods.
Many manufacturers have already ditched trans fats, but these six foods sometimes still contain the stuff.

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` Plastic Chemical `Azodicarbonamide ‘ found in nearly 500 foods and supplied by around 130 Companies’


#AceFoodNews says latest reports from EWG state that a `Plastic Chemical found in nearly 500 foods sold in US, by over 130 companies.

Nearly 500 food items commonly sold in the United States contain a chemical compound also used in synthetic leathers and yoga mats, but a health research and advocacy organization is aiming to change that.

azodicarbonamideFast-food chain restaurant Subway made headlines earlier this month when it announced that it would no longer be including that compound  azodicarbonamide or ADA — as a “dough conditioner” in the sandwich bread used in thousands of locations around the globe. But researchers at the Environmental Working Group say Subway isn’t the only guilty party, and that roughly 130 other companies mass-produce and sell an array of products that should have that chemical from their recipes as well.

According to a report released by that group on Thursday this week, consumers are just about as likely to find azodicarbonamide while at the grocery store as they would be inside a plastics factory. The Environmental Working Group, or EWG, has constructed a database containing the ingredients of 80,000 foods sold across the US, and say Subway shouldn’t be the only ones changing their recipes.

“This industrial plastics chemical shows up in many commercial baked goods as a ‘dough conditioner’ that renders large batches of dough easier to handle and makes the finished products puffier and tough enough to withstand shipping and storage. According to the new EWG Food Database of ingredients in 80,000 foods, now under development, ADA turns up in nearly 500 items and in more than 130 brands of bread, bread stuffing and snacks, including many advertised as ‘healthy,’” the report reads.

Among the suspect brands, the EWG report claims, are Ball Park, Butternut, Country Hearth, Fleischman’s, Food Club, Harvest Pride, Healthy Life, Jimmy Dean, Joseph Campione, Kroger, Little Debbie, Mariano’s, Marie Callendar’s, Martin’s, Mother’s, Nature’s Own, Pillsbury, Roman Meal, Sara Lee, Schmidt, Shoprite, Safeway, Smucker’s, Sunbeam, Turano, Tyson, Village Hearth and Wonder.

Environmental Working Group

Environmental Working Group (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“EWG recommends that consumers take steps to avoid the industrial additive ADA in their food. It is an unnecessary ingredient, its use has raised concerns about occupational exposure, and questions remain about its potential risk to consumers,” the group writes. “EWG also calls on all manufacturers to immediately end its use in food.”

Federal regulators, on the other hand, haven’t had a problem with ADA just yet. The US Food and Drug Administration has long approved the addition of ADA in consumable, as long as its presence doesn’t exceed 0.0045 percent of the weight of the flour used, as have the FDA’s Canadian counterparts. Elsewhere regulators have been more willing to hear out consumer concerns, however, and officials in Australia and the European Union have failed to give the okay to ADAs.

Soon that same anti-sentiment could become rampant in America: earlier this month US Senator Charles Schumer (D-New York) asked the FDA to ban ADAs altogether, and other fast-food chains have been pressured to stop using the chemical in the wake of the successful Subway petition that garnered more than 67,000 signatures from anti-azodicarbonamide advocates.

The FDA approved the chemical compound as being safe-in-moderation with regards to foods meant for human consumption back in 1962, but the banning 25 years later of another common dough conditioner — potassium bromate — has increased reliance on ADA ever since.

Despite being cleared as safe by the FDA, the World Health Organization has gone the record to say that epidemiological studies in humans and animals alike have produced “abundant evidence that azodicarbonamide can induce asthma, other respiratory symptoms and skin sensitization”

 

 

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#SAYNO2GMO : ” Farming & Bio-Technology Groups are Banding Together to Push Federal Labelling”


#AceFoodNews says `Food, Biotech Groups’ banding together to influence GMO labelling efforts’ 

Published time: February 06, 2014 23:16

 

Reuters / Albert Gea

Reuters / Albert Gea

Powerful farming and biotechnology interest groups announced Thursday they are banding together to push a federal voluntary labelling standard for genetically engineered food in an effort to stem the tide of state legislation seeking to mandate labelling.

The Coalition for Safe Affordable Food consists of 29 formidable trade groups that say they plan to lobby on Capitol Hill for a national standard that would allow manufacturers to voluntarily label food and beverage products made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In recent years, voters in states such as California and Washington have narrowly defeated ballot initiatives proposing mandatory GMO labeling, though not without dragging members of the new Coalition into expensive campaigns to defeat the measures.

English: Logo of the U.S. Food and Drug Admini...

English: Logo of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (2006) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The group says it will seek to empower the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “to establish federal standards for companies that want to voluntarily label their product for the absence-of or presence-of GMO food ingredients.” In addition, the Coalition proposes the FDA mandate labels for GMO food or ingredients that the agency deems a “health, safety or nutrition issue,” though no consumables currently fall in such a category.

The Coalition is also advocating the FDA define “natural” foods to include those consisting of GMOs.

Supporters of labeling said the Coalition has seen the growing demand for GMO labeling across the country and is now admittedly trying to pre-empt state attempts to inform consumers of scientifically dubious genetically engineered food.

“These companies spent nearly $70 million in California and Washington State to defeat GE labelling initiatives. They know that the food movement’s power is growing and that labeling is not a matter of if but when,” said Andrew Kimbrell, executive director of the Center for Food Safety“These companies have failed to win over consumers who overwhelmingly support the mandatory labeling of GMOs and now they’re trying to steal away consumer choice in Congress.”

States like Connecticut and Maine have recently passed legislation on labelling. Alaska’s legislature has passed a measure requiring the labeling of GMO fish and fish products. In Connecticut, critics say its new labeling law was gutted by lobbying pressure which requires four other northeastern states to pass their own GMO-labeling laws before the state’s takes effect. Those four states must collectively represent a population of 20 million people or more.

The Centre for Food Safety says over 30 states are expected to introduce GMO labeling laws during the 2014 legislative session. In Oregon, a labelling ballot initiative is already being planned.

On the federal level, legislation requiring mandatory labeling of all GMO foods has been introduced in the Senate and House, though it is not supported by the Coalition.

English: Author: Food and Drug Administration ...

English: Author: Food and Drug Administration website U.S. Government documents are, by law, not subject to copyright (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A top member of the Coalition – the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), a major food industry lobbying group – raised and spent the bulk of the overall $22 million that opponents of labeling sank into defeating Washington State’sballot initiative on GMO labeling last year. That total number was three times the amount that proponents of labeling spent in the state. GMA was joined in its effort by allies such as biotech giants Monsanto, Bayer, and DuPont.

“The legislation we’re proposing would prevent state legislation that conflicts with the federal standards,” GMA president Pamela Bailey said of the Coalition’s aim with the new proposals, The Hill reported.

Food industry trade groups, alarmed by the growing animosity against GMOs, began circulating plans for the voluntary labeling push in November – just days after Washington’s measure was defeated.

Federal standards like the ones the Coalition has now called for are necessary to “guard against a costly, unnecessary and inefficient state-by-state system,” a November memo among the GMA-led industry groups said. The Coalition wants an FDA-controlled system to maintain cheaper operations and avoid “the creation of a complicated patchwork of state-based labeling rules that would increase, rather than reduce, consumer confusion,” said Kraig R. Naasz, president of the American Frozen Food Institute, according to The Hill.

Critics of the Coalition’s approach point out that a “voluntary” law means nothing, as labeling GMOs is already legal and only done by choice.

“Voluntary labeling of GE foods is already permitted under the law, but no company has ever chosen to do so because GE foods offer consumers no benefits and only potential risk,” said the Center for Food Safety’s Kimbrell.“Instead of working together to meet consumer demand, GMA is using its deep pockets to ensure that congress and consumers are misled about their food supply.”

Supporters of GMOs say adverse effects of food that come from the manipulation of an organism’s genetic material are unproven at this point.

“If there was any indication GM ingredients were not safe, we would not be using them,” said Martin Barbre, president of the National Corn Growers Association.

T-shirt against GMO food. The logo is not copy...

T-shirt against GMO food. The logo is not copyrighted. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The US Department of Agriculture says over 80 percent of corn and over 90 percent of soy in the US are GMOs.

Yet science is also inconclusive on whether genetically engineered products can cause long-term harm to human health. At least, that is the consensus held by the several dozen countries which have banned or severely restricted their use worldwide.

“While risk assessments are conducted as part of GE product approval, the data are generally supplied by the company seeking approval, and GE companies use their patent rights to exercise tight control over research on their products,” the Union of Concerned Scientists said of GMOs. “In short, there is a lot we don’t know about the risks of GE – which is no reason for panic, but a good reason for caution.”

The organization – a broad coalition of scientists and citizens dedicated to“rigorous, independent science” without “political calculations or corporate hype” – says there are concerns about GMOs beyond the basic health problems that have been linked to their consumption.

“Rather than supporting a more sustainable agriculture and food system with broad societal benefits, the technology has been employed in ways that reinforce problematic industrial approaches to agriculture,” the Union stated.“Policy decisions about the use of GE have too often been driven by biotech industry PR campaigns, rather than by what science tells us about the most cost-effective ways to produce abundant food and preserve the health of our farmland.”

 

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#Chefs-tip : “Healthy Eating Bok Choy Recipe”


#AceRecipeNews says a little used and rarely tired is”Bok Choy” abd it is good and full of nutrition, so thought a simple 4 minute, recipe is in order.

Enjoy this great tasting recipe and get 375% of your Daily Value for vitamin A, 318% DV for vitamin C, 188% DV for vitamin K and 69% for folate!

4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy Prep and Cook Time: 10 minutesIngredients:

  • 1 lb bok choy, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 3 TBS low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 drops soy sauce
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional:
  • 1 TBS grated ginger
  • 2 TBS tofu, cubed
  • toasted sesame seeds

Directions:

  1. Chop bok choy and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health-promoting properties.
  2. In a stainless steel heat broth. When it begins to steam add bok choy and healthy saute, Healthy Sauté for 4 minutes.
  3. Toss with garlic, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste and any of the optional ingredients you would like to include.

Serves 2

Nutritional Profile

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
(280.93 grams)
Calories: 218
NutrientDRI/DV
 vitamin A337.8%
 vitamin C141.3%
 vitamin K90.2%
 folate37.7%
 vitamin B627.6%
 calcium24.2%
 manganese19.5%

Introduction to Recipe Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify recipes that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Recipe Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the recipes that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the recipe doesn’t contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this recipe’s in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients – not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good – please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you’ll need to glance back up to see the ingredients used in the recipe and the number of serving sizes provided by the recipe. Our nutrient ratings are based on a single serving. For example, if a recipe makes 4 servings, you would be receiving the nutrient amounts listed in the chart by eating 1/4th of the combined ingredients found in the recipe. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this recipe and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration‘s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
280.93 grams
Calories: 218
Nutrient Amount DRI/DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
vitamin A 10134.87 IU 337.8 27.9 excellent
vitamin C 106.04 mg 141.4 11.7 excellent
vitamin K 81.19 mcg 90.2 7.4 excellent
folate 151.00 mcg 37.8 3.1 good
vitamin B6 0.47 mg 27.6 2.3 good
calcium 242.59 mg 24.3 2.0 good
manganese 0.39 mg 19.5 1.6 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%
very good DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%
good DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy

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E-Numbers and Additives and How We Regulate Their Use


Codex alimentarius. E-codes for food additives...

As a chef and a qualified assessor l have to be aware of many things including Health and Safety plans for Food Safety and what l prepare in meals for my clients,customers and residents. This includes the use of additives, colours and E-numbers, some of which cannot harm you, but many that have dramatic side-affects! In this post l would like to give you an overview of  my job in these areas. Also providing extracts and details of what these additions to our everyday food, really do! I intend to cover other areas of trans-fats and uses of oils at a later date!

Anyway Food Additives the good and bad of how we needed to regulate! This was with the advent of processed foods in the second half of the 20th century, many more additives have been introduced, of both natural and artificial origin.

To regulate these additives, and inform consumers, each additive is assigned a unique number, termed as “E numbers”, which is used in Europe for all approved additives. This numbering scheme has now been adopted and extended by the Codex Alimentarius (Latin for “Book of Food”) and is a collection of internationally recognized standards, codes of practice, guidelines and other recommendations relating to foods, food production and food safety.

Commissioned to internationally identify all additives, regardless of whether they are approved for use

E numbers are all prefixed by “E”, but countries outside Europe use only the number, whether the additive is approved in Europe or not. For example, acetic acid is written as E260 on products sold in Europe, but is simply known as additive 260 in some countries. Additive 103, alkanet, is not approved for use in Europe so does not have an E number, although it is approved for use in Australia and New Zealand. Since 1987, Australia has had an approved system of labelling for additives in packaged foods. Each food additive has to be named or numbered. The numbers are the same as in Europe, but without the prefix ‘E’.

Categories:

Food additives can be divided into several groups, although some overlap between them.

Acids
Food acids are added to make flavours “sharper”, and act as preservatives and antioxidants. Common food acids include vinegar, citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, fumaric acid, and lactic acid.
Acidity regulators
Acidity regulators are used to change or otherwise control the acidity and alkalinity of foods.
Anti-caking agents
Anticaking agents keep powders such as milk powder from caking or sticking.
Anti-foaming agents
Antifoaming agents reduce or prevent foaming in foods.
Antioxidants
Antioxidants such as vitamin C act as preservatives by inhibiting the effects of oxygen on food, and can be beneficial to health.
Bulking agents
Bulking agents such as starch are additives that increase the bulk of food without affecting its taste.
Food colouring
Colorings are added to food to replace colours lost during preparation, or to make food look more attractive.
Colour retention agents
In contrast to colourings, colour retention agents are used to preserve a food’s existing colour.
Emulsifiers
Emulsifiers allow water and oils to remain mixed together in an emulsion, as in mayonnaise, ice cream, and homogenized milk.
Flavours
Flavours are additives that give food a particular taste or smell, and may be derived from natural ingredients or created artificially.
Flavour enhancers
Flavor enhancers enhance a food’s existing flavours. They may be extracted from natural sources (through distillation, solvent extraction, maceration, among other methods) or created artificially.
Flour treatment agents
Flour treatment agents are added to flour to improve its colour or its use in baking.
Glazing agents
Glazing agents provide a shiny appearance or protective coating to foods.
Humectants
Humectants prevent foods from drying out.
Tracer gas
Tracer gas allow for package integrity testing to prevent foods from being exposed to atmosphere, thus guaranteeing shelf life.
Preservatives
Preservatives prevent or inhibit spoilage of food due to fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms.
Stabilizers
Stabilizers, thickeners and gelling agents, like agar or pectin (used in jam ) give foods a firmer texture. While they are not true emulsifiers, they help to stabilize emulsions.
Sweeteners
Sweeteners are added to foods for flavouring. Sweeteners other than sugar are added to keep the food energy (calories) low, or because they have beneficial effects for diabetes mellitus and tooth decay and diarrhea.
Thickeners
Thickeners are substances which, when added to the mixture, increase its viscosity without substantially modifying its other properties.
caffeine and other GRAS (generally recognized as safe) additives such as sugar and salt are not required to go through the regulation process.

Safety:

With the increasing use of processed foods since the 19th century, there has been a great increase in the use of food additives of varying levels of safety. This has led to legislation in many countries regulating their use. For example, boric acid was widely used as a food preservative from the 1870s to the 1920s, but was banned after World War I due to its toxicity, as demonstrated in animal and human studies. During World War II, the urgent need for cheap, available food preservatives led to it being used again, but it was finally banned in the 1950s.Such cases led to a general mistrust of food additives, and an application of the precautionary principle led to the conclusion that only additives that are known to be safe should be used in foods. In the USA, this led to the adoption of the Delaney clause, an amendment to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938, stating that no carcinogenic substances may be used as food additives. However, after the banning of cyclamates in the USA and Britain in 1969, saccharin, the only remaining legal artificial sweetener at the time, was found to cause cancer in rats. Widespread public outcry in the USA, partly communicated to Congress by postage-paid postcards supplied in the packaging of sweetened soft drinks, led to the retention of saccharin despite its violation of the Delaney clause.

In September 2007, research financed by Britain’s Food Standards Agency and published online by the British medical journal The Lancet, presented evidence that a mix of additives commonly found in children’s foods increases the mean level of hyperactivity. The team of researchers concluded that “the finding lends strong support for the case that food additives exacerbate hyperactive behaviours (inattention, impulsivity and over-activity) at least into middle childhood.” That study examined the effect of artificial colours and a sodium benzoate preservative, and found both to be problematic for some children. Further studies are needed to find out whether there are other additives that could have a similar effect, and it is unclear whether some disturbances can also occur in mood and concentration in some adults. In the February 2008 issue of its publication,AAP Grand Rounds, the American Academy of Pediatrics concluded that a low-additive diet is a valid intervention for children with ADHD:

“Although quite complicated, this was a carefully conducted study in which the investigators went to great lengths to eliminate bias and to rigorously measure outcomes. The results are hard to follow and somewhat inconsistent. For many of the assessments there were small but statistically significant differences of measured behaviours in children who consumed the food additives compared with those who did not. In each case increased hyperactive behaviours were associated with consuming the additives. For those comparisons in which no statistically significant differences were found, there was a trend for more hyperactive behaviours associated with the food additive drink in virtually every assessment. Thus, the overall findings of the study are clear and require that even we skeptic’s, who have long doubted parental claims of the effects of various foods on the behaviour of their children, admit we might have been wrong”

In 2007,Food Standards Australia New Zealand published an official shoppers’ guidance with which the concerns of food additives and their labeling are mediated.

There has been significant controversy associated with the risks and benefits of food additives. Some artificial food additives have been linked with cancer, digestive problems, neurological conditions, ADHD, heart disease or obesity. Natural additives may be similarly harmful or be the cause of allergic reactions in certain individuals. For example,safrole was used to flavour root beer until it was shown to be carcinogenic. Due to the application of the Delaney clause, it may not be added to foods, even though it occurs naturally in sassafras and sweet basil.

Extreme caution should be taken with sodium nitrite which is mainly used as a food colouring agent. Sodium nitrite is added to meats to produce an appealing and fresh red colour to the consumer. Sodium nitrite can produce cancer causing chemicals such as Minestrone’s, and numerous studies have shown a link between nitrite and cancer in humans that consume processed and cured meats.

Blue 1, Blue 2, Red 3, and Yellow 6 are among the food colourings that have been linked to various health risks in animal models. Blue 1 is used to colour candy, soft drinks, and pastries and there has been some evidence that it may cause cancer in mice, but studies have not been replicated. Blue 2 can be found in pet food, soft drinks, and pastries, and has shown to cause brain tumours in mice. Red 3, mainly used in cherries for cocktails has been correlated with thyroid tumours in rats. Yellow 6, used in sausages, gelatin, and candy can lead to the attribution of gland and kidney tumours, again in animal models and contains carcinogens, but in minimal amounts.[unreliable source?]. It should be noted that many animal models are poor substitutes for studying carcinogenic effects in humans because the physiology of rabbits, mice and non-human primates can be very different from humans in the relevant biochemical pathways. There has been no scientific consensus on the carcinogenic properties of these agents in humans and studies are still ongoing.

In the EU it can take 10 years or more to obtain approval for a new food additive. This includes five years of safety testing, followed by two years for evaluation by the European Food Safety Authority and another three years before the additive receives an EU-wide approval for use in every country in the European Union. Apart from testing and analysing food products during the whole production process to ensure safety and compliance with regulatory standards, trading standards officers (in the UK) protect the public from any illegal use or potentially dangerous misuse of food additives by performing random testing of food products.

SCIENCE:

Many food additives absorb radiation in the ultraviolet and / or visible region of the spectrum. This absorbency can be used to determine the concentration of an additive in a sample using external calibration. However, additives may occur together and the absorbency by one could interfere with the absorbency of another. A prior separation stage is necessary and the additives are first separated by high liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then determined on-line using a UV and/or visible detector.

General Texts:

As “ Fully Qualified Assessor “ l have to provide training for Food Hygiene (general principles, codes of hygienic practice in specific industries or food handling establishments, guidelines for the use of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point or “HACCP” system). This has become even more important as food has become a even greater source of poisoning over the past 10 years or more.

History of HACCP:

HACCP is believed to stem from of a production process monitoring used during World War II because traditional “end of the pipe” testing on artillery shell’s firing mechanisms could not be performed, and a large percent of the artillery shells made at the time were either duds or mis-firing. HACCP itself was conceived in the 1960s when the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) asked Pillsbury to design and manufacture the first foods for space flights.

The HACCP seven principles:

Principle 1: Conduct a hazard analysis. – Plans determine the food safety hazards and identify the preventive measures the plan can apply to control these hazards. A food safety hazard is any biological, chemical, or physical property that may cause a food to be unsafe for human consumption.

Principle 2: Identify critical control points. – A critical control point (CCP) is a point, step, or procedure in a food manufacturing process at which control can be applied and, as a result, a food safety hazard can be prevented, eliminated, or reduced to an acceptable level.

Principle 3: Establish critical limits for each critical control point. – A critical limit is the maximum or minimum value to which a physical, biological, or chemical hazard must be controlled at a critical control point to prevent, eliminate, or reduce to an acceptable level.

Principle 4: Establish critical control point monitoring requirements. – Monitoring activities are necessary to ensure that the process is under control at each critical control point. In the United States, the FSIS is requiring that each monitoring procedure and its frequency be listed in the HACCP plan.

Principle 5: Establish corrective actions. – These are actions to be taken when monitoring indicates a deviation from an established critical limit. The final rule requires a plant’s HACCP plan to identify the corrective actions to be taken if a critical limit is not met. Corrective actions are intended to ensure that no product injurious to health or otherwise adulterated as a result of the deviation enters commerce.

Principle 6: Establish procedures for ensuring the HACCP system is working as intended. – Validation ensures that the plants do what they were designed to do; that is, they are successful in ensuring the production of a safe product. Plants will be required to validate their own HACCP plans. FSIS will not approve HACCP plans in advance, but will review them for conformance with the final rule.

Verification ensures the HACCP plan is adequate, that is, working as intended. Verification procedures may include such activities as review of HACCP plans, CCP records, critical limits and microbial sampling and analysis. FSIS is requiring that the HACCP plan include verification tasks to be performed by plant personnel. Verification tasks would also be performed by FSIS inspectors. Both FSIS and industry will undertake microbial testing as one of several verification activities.

Verification also includes ‘validation’ – the process of finding evidence for the accuracy of the HACCP system (e.g. scientific evidence for critical limitations).

Principle 7: Establish record keeping procedures.The HACCP regulation requires that all plants maintain certain documents, including its hazard analysis and written HACCP plan, and records documenting the monitoring of critical control points, critical limits, verification activities, and the handling of processing deviations.

Conclusion:

So in conclusion there is much more to a chefs job than just cooking great food, you need to be a person that has “Health and Safety“ in mind and know that what you are serving your customers ,clients or residents is healthy, tasty, nutritious and wholesome. But does not contain any Additives or E-Numbers that could have side-affects on the people you are providing the food, so you need to know your “Codex Alimentarius” (“Latin for “Book of Food”) or at least know where you can find the information.

Bye for now and more later, CJ

{Resident Chef} Ace News Group

As usual need any help or guidance you can now email our news desk at “Ace Food News” at leave-your-views@yopmail.com or leave a comment and l will reply.