‘ The Five Basic Rules for Cooking Meat ‘


You can cook meat a number of different ways, from roasting to pan-searing to barbecuing. However, there are five basic principles that apply to the vast majority of techniques when it comes to meat and poultry. Here’s what we’ve found after years of cooking in our test kitchen:

1. USE HIGH HEAT TO DEVELOP FLAVOR

meatcookery1

Browning creates a tremendous amount of flavor and is a key step when cooking meat. This happens through a process called the Maillard reaction, named after the French chemist who first described it in the early 1900s. The Maillard reaction occurs when the amino acids and sugars in the food are subjected to heat, which causes them to combine. In turn, hundreds of different flavor compounds are created. These compounds break down to form yet more new flavor compounds, and so on, and so on. When browning meat, you want a deep brown sear and a discernibly thick crust on all sides—best obtained by quick cooking over high heat.

To ensure that meat browns properly, first make sure the meat is dry before it goes into the pan; pat it thoroughly with paper towels. This is especially important with previously frozen meat, which often releases a great deal of water. Second, make sure the pan is hot by preheating it over high heat until the fat added to the pan is shimmering or almost smoking. Finally, make sure not to overcrowd the pan; there should be at least 1/4 inch of space between the pieces of meat. If there isn’t, the meat is likely to steam instead of brown. If need be, cook the meat in two or three batches.

2. USE LOW HEAT TO PRESERVE MOISTURE

For large cuts of meat or poultry, we often advocate a low-and-slow cooking method. We find that this approach allows the center to come up to the desired internal temperature with less risk of overcooking the outer layers.

An experiment we recently conducted proves that even cooking isn’t the only benefit of slow roasting: It also helps minimize the loss of flavorful juices (and fat). We took two 6‑pound rib roasts and roasted one at 450 degrees and the other at 250 degrees until each was medium-rare. We then weighed the cooked roasts. The slow-cooked roast had lost about 9.25 percent of its starting weight, while the high-temperature roast had lost nearly 25 percent of its original weight. Why the difference? Proteins shrink less and express less moisture and fat when cooked at moderate temperatures than when roasted at high heat.

3. MATCH THE CUT TO THE COOKING METHOD

meatcookery2

Tough cuts, which generally come from the heavily exercised parts of the animal, such as the shoulder or rump, respond best to slow-cooking methods, such as pot roasting, stewing, or barbecuing. The primary goal of slow cooking is to melt collagen in the connective tissue, thereby transforming a tough piece of meat into a tender one. These cuts are always served well done.

Tender cuts with little connective tissue generally come from parts of the animal that receive little exercise (like the loin, the area along the back of the cow or pig). These cuts respond best to quicker, dry-heat cooking methods, such as grilling or roasting. These cuts are cooked to a specific doneness. Prolonged cooking increases moisture loss and can turn these tender cuts tough.

4. DON’T FORGET ABOUT CARRYOVER COOKING

Since the temperature of meat will continue to rise as it rests, an effect called carryover cooking, meat should be removed from the oven, grill, or pan when it’s 5 to 10 degrees below the desired serving temperature. Carryover cooking doesn’t apply to poultry and fish (they don’t retain heat as well as the dense muscle structure in meat). The following temperatures should be used to determine when to stop the cooking process.

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*These doneness temperatures represent the test kitchen’s assessment of palatability weighed against safety. The basics from the USDA differ somewhat: Cook whole cuts of meat, including pork, to an internal temperature of at least 145 degrees and let rest for at least 3 minutes. Cook all ground meats to an internal temperature of at least 160 degrees. Cook all poultry, including ground poultry, to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees. You may read more information on food safety from the USDA.

5. REST YOUR MEAT

The purpose of resting meat is to allow the juices, which are driven to the center during cooking, to redistribute themselves throughout the meat. As a result, meat that has rested will shed much less juice than meat sliced straight after cooking. To test this theory, we grilled four steaks and let two rest while slicing into the other two immediately. The steaks that had rested for 10 minutes shed 40 percent less juice than the steaks sliced right after cooking. The meat on the unrested steaks also looked grayer and was not as tender. A thin steak or chop should rest for 5 to 10 minutes, a thicker roast for 15 to 20 minutes. And when cooking a large roast like a turkey, the meat should rest for about 40 minutes before it is carved.

cvr_sfs_pepper_crusted_tenderloin_bw-9

Now that you know the basic principles, try applying them to one of our recipes, likePepper-Crusted Beef Tenderloin Roast. It’s easy to make—just oven-roast it until it’s done—and, as the absolute most tender cut of beef, it’s luxurious to eat. We boosted the flavor with a crunchy peppercorn crust.

ilo_pork_primalcutsOn cimeatbook.com, find meat recipes, meat video tips, and all meaty matters regarding The Cook’s Illustrated Meat Book.

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#Chefs-tip ” Beauty of Eating Cabbage”


English: green cabbage

English: green cabbage (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceFoodNews says getting children to eat anything such as green-stuff, or something good-for-you ,such as a a vegetable, is really hard nowadays’ as l have found working with the elderly and disabled. The word cabbage being one such word’s ,as it conjures up those nasty school dinners, of yesteryear, that were so overcooked and sour and did not resemble this gorgeous vegetable to the right. Any form of nutrition had been boiled out! Even meals that were simply called “Boiled Beef and Carrots” left people just eating the meat and leave their veg, on the plate.

So ask yourself why?

Well if you ever saw a picture of stewed cabbage ,over cooked and limp, you would not want to eat it either?

But times change and recipes try to show us the real benefits of eating this wonderful vegetable, As cooking cabbage slowly and not taking too much notice of our mother’s and their way’s, back from the 50’s and 60’s, this lovely green vegetable, will not lose all of its sulfur compounds six hours after being cut, nor does it lose all of its sulfur compounds after being cooked. Much of the sulfur in cabbage and other foods is attached either to proteins or related compounds, and this attachment prevents it from being lost completely. There are several dozen sulfur-containing derivatives of the amino acid cysteine found in cabbage and an equivalent number of associated sulfoxides as well. Other sulfur-containing (thiol) molecules are formed when cabbage is cooked. While some of these compounds are definitely volatile and lost during cooking, or over time after the cabbage has been chopped, not all are removed.

English: Cabbage

English: Cabbage (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In addition, the cutting process may actually increase certain health benefits since some of the newly formed (and transformed) sulfur-containing molecules have been shown to have cancer-preventive properties. This includes the sulfur-containing glucosinolates, which are formed when an enzyme called myrosinase is activated. Because the cutting and chopping of the cabbage is an event that activates myrosinase enzymes, it’s actually helpful to let your chopped cabbage sit for a few minutes before cooking it (if you are planning to cook it). This time period will let themyrosinase enzymes convert some of the original sulfur-containing molecules in cabbage into glucosinolates. If you cook your chopped cabbage immediately after chopping, the heat will denature the myrosinase enzymes and the sulfur-containing glucosinolates will be unable to form.

I haven’t seen studies showing the rate of sulfur-related changes in cooked cabbage over time. Nor have I seen studies showing sulfur-related changes in chopped raw cabbage. It’s the antioxidant nutrient loss—and particularly the vitamin C loss—that shows up as most time-sensitive in both chopped raw cabbage and chopped cooked cabbage.

Overcooking vegetables, including cabbage, is one of the best ways I know to rob vegetables of their nutrient benefits; when it comes to cabbage this includes its sulfur-related benefits. I recommend about five minutes (at most) for the steaming or “Healthy Sautéing” of raw cabbage. Prior to cooking, I recommend about the five-minute waiting period to allow sulfur-related changes to occur in the freshly chopped cabbage.

Virtually all types of cabbage will store safely in the refrigerator in whole-head form for at least one week. But a partly chopped cabbage head should be tightly covered and kept for no more than three to five days. Many raw cabbage recipes will contain either vinegar or lemon juice and these acidic liquids will help preserve the refrigerated cabbage-containing recipe over a period of several days. For optimal health benefits, however, I recommend enjoying a raw cabbage dish as soon as possible after it has been prepared.

 

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” Sweet Potatoes High in Antioxidants”


#AceFoodNews says another guest news and views post, which l will start posting as from this week as “Food of the Week” with recipes that are good and full of nutrition with highlighting the value of good eating and vitamin enriched foods.

Food of the Week . . . Sweet PotatoesSweet potatoes are in the peak of their season and are our food of the week. These delicious vegetables are so rich in antioxidants. They have a high concentration of carotenoids, such as beta-carotene (the redder varieties also contain lycopene), as well as vitamin C, all of which act as powerful antioxidants to help combat free radical activity that would otherwise damage cells. internal structures and cell membranes. Additionally, they contain unique root storage proteins that have been observed to have significant antioxidant capacities. In one study, these proteins had about one-third the antioxidant activity of glutathione, one of the body’s most potent internally produced antioxidants. Read more … Sweet Potatoes.

7-Minute Healthy Steamed Sweet Potatoes
Recipe of the Weekview recipe …

The Food Tip of the Week:
Tips for Preparing Sweet Potatoes

The Latest News About Sweet Potatoes

#AceHealthNews says how sweet it is for your health to eat sweet potatoes! Not only do they taste like dessert, but they also provide some surprising health benefits … The Latest News About Sweet Potatoes.

Best Food Sources for:

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” Mint Garbanzo Bean Salad”


#AceFoodNews says “Start The New Year Off With A Healthy Meal That Is Full Of Nutrition”

Today’s Recipe: Copyright © 2013 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

If you don’t know what to serve for dinner tonight

This salad can be kept in your refrigerator for a few days getting more flavourful as it marinates. It’s a great lunch or dinner addition to your Healthiest Way of Eating.

Minted Garbanzo Bean Salad

Minted Garbanzo Bean SaladPrep and Cook Time: 15 Minutes:

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium fresh tomatoes, seeds and excess pulp removed, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 cups peeled diced cucumber, (cut lengthwise and scoop out seeds), diced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 medium onion, finely minced
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 cups garbanzo beans or 1 15oz can garbanzo beans(BPA free), rinsed and drained well
  • 3 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2-1/2 TBS chopped fresh mint
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 medium head romaine lettuce, use tender whole leaves for bed

Directions:

  1. Mince onion and press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health-promoting benefits.
  2. Mix all ingredients except lettuce together and chill. This is best if it chills for at least 15 minutes. Serve on a bed of lettuce.

Serves 4

#AceHealthNews

Copyright © 2013 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

 

Dorito Bread and Butter is Like Edible Rock and Roll (VIDEO) – According to Bon Appetit


#AceFoodNews says this is not for me l prefer fresh crusty bread and butter #goodfood

 

Film poster for Bon Appétit. Copyright 2010, ©...

Film poster for Bon Appétit. Copyright 2010, © Morena Films (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Bon Appetit says may have just raised the bar on Dorito recipes forever with its video and accompanying instructions for Dorito Bread and Dorito Compound Butter. We all know Doritos look great in many forms, but this bread and butter will be hard to beat.

 

With some serious guitar in the background, the video makes this awesome creation look as rock and roll as it sounds. Andy Rapoport, brother of Bon Appetit’s Editor-In-Chief Adam, wanted to pair “man’s most basic sustenance” — bread — “with an ingredient most modern, heavily processed, and addictive: the Dorito.” We think he succeeded with amazing, Dorito-orange flying colors. #profitb4people

 

EDITOR: Says well what is your opinion and l will pass it to chefs-tips  

 

 

Cookery Hints and Tips From The Cradocks


English: portrait of Fanny Cradock

English: portrait of Fanny Cradock (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

An elegant woman is seen squeezing a bright yellow substance through an icing tube creating carnations and putting them on the plate. Carnations are just another way to serve butter – colour it with some harmless food dye and squeeze it through the icing tube on a little cube of bread shaping a flower. Excellent!

Famous husband and wife cooking team, Fanny and John Cradock, are showing some of the ways to serve savouries. Presentation of the food is as important as the food itself.

Next come swans made of hard-boiled eggs. Two thin slices are cut off vertically at each side of the egg. Then, a pipe cleaner is shaped into S and placed on top of the egg creating swan’s long neck and head. Two cut pieces are ‘glued’ back to the sides with mashed potato (or cream). Mrs Cradock places the swan with the other swans – on the plate covered with chopped parsley.

John Cradock scoops small cheese balls to place them on a plate as flower petals. With a bit of butter in the middle and couple of real mint leaves they look very nice – almost too nice to eat.

And finally, Mrs Fanny Cradock shows the audience how to ‘sculpture’ an orange into a basket and some other decorative things. Story ends with C/U of a plate with different decorative things made of oranges.

Note: the Cambridge Biographical Encylopedia states the correct spelling of Fanny and John’s surname as ‘Cradock’. For search purposes the alternative spelling is ‘Craddock’.

Chefs Editorial:

So l hope you enjoy taking a look at the video courtesy of  British Pathe News and some of the old ways of doing things in those days, like Van Dyke with orange baskets ,something l had to learn when l trained as a chef!  Also just love those swans with use of pipe-cleaners! Brings back memories of how we use to cook!

Enjoy, more soon, when time!

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/cookery-hints-aka-cooking-tips/query/wildcard

Please remember the use of any of these materials are copyrighted by British Pathe News for preview only click on the link: British Pathe News and it will take you to the video, it is not that long so well worth seeing!

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