‘ World is Running out of Chocolate ‘


#AceFoodNews – Nov.26 – There’s no easy way to say this: You’re eating too much chocolate, all of you. And it’s getting so out of hand that the world could be headed towards a potentially disastrous (if you love chocolate) scenario if it doesn’t stop.

' World is Running out of Chocolate '

‘ World is Running out of Chocolate ‘

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Those are, roughly speaking, the words of two huge chocolate makers, Mars, Inc. and Barry Callebaut. And there’s some data to back them up.

Chocolate deficits, whereby farmers produce less cocoa than the world eats, are becoming the norm. Already, we are in the midst of what could be the longest streak of consecutive chocolate deficits in more than 50 years. It also looks like deficits aren’t just carrying over from year-to-year—the industry expects them to grow. Last year, the world ate roughly 70,000 metric tons more cocoa than it produced. By 2020, the two chocolate-makers warn that that number could swell to 1 million metric tons, a more than 14-fold increase; by 2030, they think the deficit could reach 2 million metric tons.

The problem is, for one, a supply issue. Dry weather in West Africa (specifically in the Ivory Coast and Ghana, where more than 70 percent of the world’s cocoa is produced) has greatly decreased production in the region. A nasty fungal disease known as frosty pod hasn’t helped either. The International Cocoa Organization estimates it has wiped out between 30 percent and 40 percent of global cocoa production. Because of all this, cocoa farming has proven a particularly tough business, and many farmers have shifted to more profitable crops, like corn, as a result.

Then there’s the world’s insatiable appetite for chocolate. China’s growing love for the stuff is of particular concern. The Chinese are buying more and more chocolate each year. Still, they only consume per capita about 5 percent of what the average Western European eats. There’s also the rising popularity of dark chocolate, which contains a good deal more cocoa by volume than traditional chocolate bars (the average chocolate bar contains about 10 percent, while dark chocolate often contains upwards of 70 percent).

For these reasons, cocoa prices have climbed by more than 60 percent since 2012, when people started eating more chocolate than the world could produce. And chocolate makers have, in turn, been forced to adjust by raising the price of their bars. Hershey’s was the first, but others have followed suit.

Efforts to counter the growing imbalance between the amount of chocolate the world wants and the amount farmers can produce has inspired a bit of much needed innovation. Specifically, an agricultural research group in Central Africa is developing trees that can produce up to seven times the amount of beans traditional cocoa trees can. The uptick in efficiency, however, might be compromising taste, says Bloomberg’s Mark Schatzker. He likens the trade-off to other mass-produced commodities.

Efforts are under way to make chocolate cheap and abundant — in the process inadvertently rendering it as tasteless as today’s store-bought tomatoes, yet another food, along with chicken and strawberries, that went from flavorful to forgettable on the road to plenitude.

It’s unclear anyone will mind a milder flavor if it keeps prices down. And the industry certainly won’t mind, so long as it keeps the potential for a gargantuan shortage at bay.

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Chocolate Mexican Coffee Cake


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Chocolate Mexican Coffee Cake

The process for making chocolate and cocoa powder is made by first grinding cacao nibs into a cocoa mass, which is then liquefied into a paste known as chocolate liquor. After the cocoa butter is forced out of the chocolate liquor by either a press or a special technique known as the Broma method, the remaining cocoa solids are processed to make fine unsweetened cocoa powder. Natural cocoa powder is lighter brown in color than Dutch-processed cocoa, tastes slightly bitter, and has a deep chocolate flavor.

Coffee: Has been proven to reduce risk for diabetes and Parkinson’s. It also stimulates enzymes that protect against colon cancer. It is Chlorogenic acid and it is one of the main caffeic acids found in coffee that has antioxidant properties. It’s also found in sunflower seeds, carrots, tomatoes and artichokes. Its ability to lower blood glucose levels may benefit those who have…

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” Chocolate Souffle Cheesecake”


#AceFoodNews says this is another Guest Post and Recipe from an adapted recipe of Pooi Sam. Hope you enjoy cooking and eating it.

Chocolate Souffle Cake

Chocolate Souffle Cheesecake Recipe

Makes 1 | Prep Time: 15 minutes | Bake Time: 45 minutes
Contributor: CP Choong
Adapted from Pooi Sam Facebook

Ingredients:

3 Eggs, separated
120g (4oz) Dark Chocolate
120g (4oz) Cream Cheese
1 tsp lemon juice

Method:

Preheat oven to 170C/325F. Place the rack on the lower third level.

Grease a 6-inch (non-removable base) baking tin and lined bottom with parchment paper.

Melt chocolate and cream cheese over a simmering water, just hot enough to melt the chocolate, do not boil. Removed from heat.

Add egg yolks and mixed well. Set aside.

Add lemon juice into egg whites and beat until almost peak form.

Gently fold meringue into cheese mixture in 3 batches.

Pour the well combined batter into the prepared tin.

Place the baking tin in a roasting pan filled with hot water (1cm height) and bake in preheated oven for 15 minutes (170C/325F), then turn down the temperature to 160C/300F and bake for 15 minutes.

Turn off the heat, keep the cake in the oven with the oven door closed for another 15 minutes.

Remove from oven, let the cake cool completely then chill in fridge for at least 2 hours or overnight.

Chocolate Souffle CakeCook’s Notes:

  1. I used one Hershey’s Baking Bars – Semi-sweet Chocolate. You may use milk chocolate, bittersweet chocolate or white chocolate.
  2. Please take note that there is NO sugar in the recipe, if you opt for sweeter taste, please add sugar to egg whites and beat till almost peak form.

  3. If loose base baking tin is used, please double wrap with aluminium foil to prevent water seepage.

  4. It is perfectly normal that the cake shrinks after cooling. If the meringue is whipped up to the right stage and did not deflate much when folding in the cheese mixture, you will get approximately a 2” height cake.