‘ A VISIT TO A KITCHEN OF JUDITH JONES PROMOTER OF CLASSIC FRENCH COOKING ‘


As an editor, Judith Jones introduced the world to food legends like Julia Child, James Beard and Marcella Hazan. Here she shares a recipe from her latest book, ‘Love Me, Feed Me,’ a collection of dishes you can share with your dog.

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NEXT TIME YOU’RE feeling uninspired or too lazy to cook, think of Judith Jones, the book editor who introduced the world to Julia Child as well as food legends James Beard, Marcella Hazan, Edna Lewis and Madhur Jaffrey. Her legacy also includes three books co-authored with her late husband, Evan Jones, and three of her own. At 90 years old, she continues to make supper nearly every night, and to eat it at a table beside a wall of hanging pots in her kitchen on New York City’s Upper East Side. “It’s sort of indecent,” she said, “because sometimes, I begin to think around 4 o’clock, ‘Hm, is it almost time to start cooking?’ ” These days, she cooks mostly for herself and her Havanese dog, Mabon. To help others do the same, she wrote “Love Me, Feed Me: Sharing With Your Dog the Everyday Good Food You Cook and Enjoy,” published last month by Knopf. Even those without canine companions are sure to find Ms. Jones’s simple recipes—and her delight in sharing them—highly motivating.

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The thing that most people notice first about my kitchen is: all these hanging pots. I think hiding all your wonderful pots and pans is an expression of my mother’s generation, when a kitchen was just utilitarian; nobody had fun in there.

The tools I can’t live without are: a wooden spatula and a wooden fork. Wood doesn’t scrape the bottom of your pans so much. It’s gentle.

The cookbook I turn to again and again is:“Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” [Julia Child’s] wonderfully analytic way of expressing what is special about French cooking—and how to translate it to the American kitchen—was thrilling. I still go back when I’m sort of refreshing myself: “Well, what did Julia say about that?”

Le Creuset Almond Colour

The pot I reach for most is: the smallest size Le Creuset [enameled cast-iron] saucepan. I have it in copper, too. That’s just great for Mabon and me. It’s sometimes the pots that make you a better cook, so people should get pots that are pure and efficient and well-made. Good ones last a lifetime.

At this time of year, my favorite thing to eat is: root vegetables. Growing up, most of the winter we had turnips and parsnips. I remember when the first asparagus would appear in the spring, I would just cry with delight! I think that’s rather good for your palate, to hold back for when a vegetable is really ready.

I first became interested in food: when I went abroad with my husband. My awakening was clearly in France. I tell the story, in this new book, of [chef-restaurateur] Fernand Point having us in for a lunch. He didn’t know who we were; we were just scruffy Americans. But that was a great experience—a turning point, in a way, in my life. And then I had a Hungarian sister-in-law, and she introduced me to Hungarian food. She was born a countess and then she met Mr. Jones, my husband’s brother. From countess to Jones, what a tumble.

When I entertain, I like to: keep it simpler these days. When I entertained after I first came back from France, it was four courses. Always something with the drink. The main course or fish course, with a vegetable garnish—at least one—and a starch garnish. Now we’re finally up to the salad, and cheese. And, well, that’s a lot of stuff. And then dessert and coffee. Now I’d be more likely to do what I call a “made dish.” It’s all cooked and ready, and you pop it into the oven to reheat.

I don’t like it when my dinner guests: bring something. I think we’re doing too much of that. It ruins the dinner. You plan a beautifully balanced meal, and then in comes a cupcake and people feel they have to taste it and ooh and aah, and it has nothing to do with your dinner. A bottle of wine is nice and helpful, and sometimes some cheese.

I like to drink: Campari. It just cleanses me somehow and gets me ready for dinner. It’s actually better, I think, than a glass of wine on an empty stomach. But once we’re into the food, I’m a good wine drinker.

A typical breakfast for me is: my own granola with Vermont maple syrup. And I have some blueberries and bananas. If I’m in Paris, it’s a croissant and café au lait, with the lait, you know, warm and almost bubbling on the top. I love breakfast. And then I love lunch.

On weeknights, I often cook: some wonderful pork tenderloins. Usually what I end up doing is making a roast with vegetables around. It’s so simple. And then I have some left for a quick stir-fry with vegetables the next night. Or a little hash. I love hashes: You open your fridge and you see what’s in there, so they’re always a little bit different.

One of the most underrated foods is: again, root vegetables. It’s interesting to use them in different ways—not just as a separate vegetable, but, say, in a ravioli. They’re new tastes, and yet familiar. I think if you reach too hard for the new, it’s a mistake.

A food trend I’m totally over is: kale. I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy!

—Edited from an interview by Charlotte Druckman-

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` Welcome Everyone to `Ace Food News 2014 ‘ Please Comment or Post to be Approved ‘


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Cauliflower and chickpea magic..


#AFN2014

foodbod

20140210-153559.jpgYou have seen me rave about the same marinated chickpea and potatoes dish a couple of times now, and I do truly love the dish, but I do struggle with the carb on carb element of the potatoes and chickpeas all in one dish, so for this week’s Fiesta Friday party held by The Novice Gardener I thought I would try out an alternative….

Introducing marinated and roasted cauliflower and chickpeas…oh yes!!! Big yum!!! It worked a treat, the cauliflower became infused with the flavours and I caught it just when it was sufficiently cooked and roasted and before it got mushy, whilst being soft enough to soak up some of the sauce as we ate it. Click back to the original recipe for the breakdown and just add chunks of cauliflower in place of the potatoes, or as well as if you fancy!

NOTE: If you follow the original…

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5 reasons NOT to buy those Girl Scouts cookies


#AFN2014

Fellowship of the Minds

Girl Scouts USA is beginning its annual cookie sales drive.

Here are 5 reasons NOT to buy those cookies:

1. Girl Scouts promote Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion provider in the United States

Bob Unruh reports for WND that two pro-life organizations, American Life League and American Family Association are boycotting Girl Scouts cookies and urging us to join them.

Judie Brown, president of the American Life League (ALL), America’s oldest Catholic pro-life education and advocacy group, warns: “The Girl Scouts was once a trusted organization dedicated to character building in young girls and women. Now, GSUSA is abusing that trust. Most parents and grandparents remain painfully unaware the GSUSA has introduced so-called ‘family planning’ ideology in its curriculum and promotes groups like Planned Parenthood to our daughters and granddaughters.”

For its part, the American Family Association (AFA), with its several million constituents and special divisions like OneMillionMoms.com which specifically work to influence…

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Chocolate Mexican Coffee Cake


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Splendid Recipes and More

Chocolate Mexican Coffee Cake

The process for making chocolate and cocoa powder is made by first grinding cacao nibs into a cocoa mass, which is then liquefied into a paste known as chocolate liquor. After the cocoa butter is forced out of the chocolate liquor by either a press or a special technique known as the Broma method, the remaining cocoa solids are processed to make fine unsweetened cocoa powder. Natural cocoa powder is lighter brown in color than Dutch-processed cocoa, tastes slightly bitter, and has a deep chocolate flavor.

Coffee: Has been proven to reduce risk for diabetes and Parkinson’s. It also stimulates enzymes that protect against colon cancer. It is Chlorogenic acid and it is one of the main caffeic acids found in coffee that has antioxidant properties. It’s also found in sunflower seeds, carrots, tomatoes and artichokes. Its ability to lower blood glucose levels may benefit those who have…

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Spiced Candied Almonds


#AF&HN2014 says ” Nice one Shivaay” will give this one a try, for my next #SpecialOccasionParty

Shivaay Delights

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Sweet, spicy and a hint of chilli is the trio of flavour you will get with these candied almonds that crystallize as they cool down. The sugar flecks off of them with salt to lift the sweetness.

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Almonds are great for vitamin E and in turn for your skin and hair. What better way than to have them do a wonderful job for the body but also a taste sensation for our palettes!

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I used less sugar so that I got a crisp coating on the almond rather than a sticky one, I know I will be making these again! And very soon!!

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INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole almonds
½ cup granulated sugar
⅓ tsp mixed spice
pinch of red chilli powder
1 tbsp water
Sea Salt for sprinkling

METHOD

• Line a baking sheet with some greaseproof paper

• In a thick bottom base saucepan gently heat the sugar, water…

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Roasted pepper, caramelised onion & feta bread


#AF&HN2014

Shivaay Delights

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An all in one Mediterranean bread with exciting ingredients that blend so well together. The charred juicy pepper, the sweet and sour caramelised onion along with a hint of saltiness from the feta cheese makes this bread something very special, even though I do say so myself! Lovely with a light soup or just with a little butter on its own. I will definitely be experimenting more with these flavours and more breads are still to come!

INGREDIENTS

1 medium white onion sliced crescents
1/2 tbsp olive oil for onion
1/2 tsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp balsamic vinegar
1 red bell pepper
1 clove garlic crushed
30-40g feta cheese diced or crumbled
250g plain flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
2 eggs lightly beaten
100ml milk
100ml olive oil
Oil and flour for pan

METHOD

1. To roast the red bell pepper, preheat oven to 200c/400f/gas mark 6…

View original post 226 more words

#Chefs-tip: “Too Much White Sugar in your Diet can Cause Real Problems”


#AceFoodNews says very rarely do l recommend a #mustread post, but this one from the “Guardian” just needed to be posted.

United Nations World Health Organisation logo

United Nations World Health Organisation logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2012, the United Nations World Health Assembly advocated a significant new health goal: to reduce avoidable deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease kill 35 million per year. The UN has identified tobacco, alcohol and poor diet as central risk factors. The first two have been regulated by governments in order to protect public health, but poor diet is actually responsible formore disease than smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity combined.

But what component of the western diet should be targeted? The evidence suggesting that added sugar should be the target is now overwhelming. Unlike fat and protein, refined sugars offer no nutritional value and, contrary to what the food industry want you to believe, the body does not require any carbohydrate from added sugar for energy. Thus it is a source of completely unnecessary calories.

Sugars are added to the majority of processed foods in the UK. Yet disturbingly, many consumers are unaware of its presence in such large quantities. In the UK and Europe guideline daily amounts for sugar have not been updated since 2003. These obsolete guidelines still suggest one can consume a staggering 22 teaspoons of sugar daily.

World Health Organization Regions.

World Health Organization Regions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The World Health Organisation has recently been advised by scientific experts that added sugar or, more specifically, non-milk extrinsic sugar should constitute no more than 5% of energy. That would give a limit to the average man of a maximum of eight teaspoons a day and the average woman to six tea spoons a day. And that would include sugars fromfruit juice and honey.

The misleading labelling and health claims on “low-fat” foods that actually have shocking levels of sugar added is a scandal. Worse still, it has created the perfect storm for public health. Therefore, last Thursday, a group of UK and international experts, including myself, launched Action On Sugar. The main aim is to pressure the food industry to reduce added sugar in foods by 40% over four years. That would mean 100 fewer calories per person, which according to the UK Department of Health would reverse the obesity epidemic.

Health

Health (Photo credit: 401(K) 2013)

However, the industry remains in denial. Barbara Gallani, director of regulation at the Food and Drink Federation, made a statement of immediate resistance, denying sugar’s role in obesity and failing to acknowledge the multitude of scientific studies to the contrary. We mustn’t forget that it took 50 years from when the first scientific studies between smoking and lung cancer were made before any effective legislation was introduced through regulation. Why? Because Big Tobacco very successfully adopted a corporate strategy of denial. By planting doubt, confusing the public, bribing political allies and even buying the loyalty of rogue scientists.

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician an...

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician and Shadow Secretary of State for Health, speaking at the Health Hotel reception at the Manchester Central Conference Centre during the Conservative Party Conference 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The comparisons with the sugar industry are quite chilling. Leader of the Commons Andrew Lansley‘s aggressive intervention in parliament on Thursday was thus intriguing. He attempted to rubbish respected public health expert Professor Simon Capewell’s statement that sugar is the new tobacco. Lansley then compounded his errors by ignorantly asserting in the House that “sugar is essential to food”. It is not. He would have been more accurate in saying “sugar is essential to food industry profits and lining the pockets of its co-opted partners”. Lansley was a paid director of marketing company Profero to the end of 2009. Profero’s clients have included Pepsi, Mars, Pizza Hut and Diageo’s Guinness.

During his unhappy time as health secretary, Lansley promoted his brainchild, the Responsibility Deal. There, he invited fast-food companies in for cosy discussions on how to tackle obesity, cynically generating the impression of progress, but only achieving weak and meaningless voluntary calorie reduction pledges.

The food industry spends billions in junk food and sugary drink advertising, targeting the most vulnerable members of society, including children. Worse, the industry cynically associates fitness and sport with junk food and sugary drinks. Thus Mars is one of the official sponsors of the England football team. Yet one regular sized bar contains eight teaspoons of sugar, almost triple the amount recommended as a limit for a four- to eight-year-old child by the US Department of Health and Human Services’ dietary guidelines. The commonest cause of chronic pain in children is tooth decay with sugar as the number one risk factor. Regular physical activity has a multitude of health benefits; however, its effect on sustained weight loss is often weak. Furthermore, activity levels have changed little in the past 30 years as obesity has rocketed.

We are all vulnerable, because you don’t have to be overweight to be affected by diet-related disease. Of all the chronic diseases, type 2 diabetes, which is entirely preventable, is perhaps the most damaging. Diabetes increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, eye disease and leg amputations. Up to half of all diabetic patients go on to suffer acute or chronic pain, and two-thirds will ultimately develop dementia. The direct and indirect costs to the UK of diabetes is over £24bn and projected to approach £40bn by 2030. If we do nothing, this will cripple the NHS.

How does sugar compare to tobacco? A teaspoon of sugar or one cigarette will not harm you. But over time, the habit can be fatal. Unlike Big Tobacco, Big Sugar deliberately targets children. And added sugar has become so pervasive within the food environment that we can’t avoid it even if we wanted to. It is thus not simply a matter of personal choice. But perhaps most disturbing of all the similarities is the financial and political muscle that both industries have exerted to try to protect their profits, at the expense of our health. It’s time to wind back the harms of too much sugar, reverse the “diabesity” epidemic and the unspeakable suffering it causes. It’s time for Action On Sugar.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a London cardiologist, is the science director of Action on Sugar

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

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” Twelve Night Cake”


#AceFoodNews says bake a historical recipe of a “Twelve Night Cake” from the days of yore, to complete your #ChristmasFayre and ending your festivities on the 12th Evening in preparation for the 6th January and commencing the “Day of Epiphany” 

Twelfth Night Cake Recipes

Bake A Historical Epiphany Cake

Twelfth Night Cake For Celebrating Epiphany Festivities

Properly celebrate Epiphany by using these authentic Twelfth Night cake recipes to make exquisitely decorated Twelfth cakes. The festival of Epiphany to celebrate the manifestation of the Christ to the Magi, or wise men, occurs on January 6th, the twelfth day after Christmas.

From the Medieval Era to about the mid 1800s, Epiphany or Twelfth Night was celebrated more than Christmas Day in England. It was a traditional time for extinguishing the yule log and the partaking of Wassail.

As a climax to the various festivities, an ornate Twelfth Night cake was prepared and ceremoniously served at the evening feast of Twelfth Night. Whoever found the lucky, baked-in bean was declared king for the day.

Other traditionally symbolic items to be found in the rich, dense fruitcake might be a pea (for the queen), a clove (for the villain), a rag (for the tart), and a twig (for the fool).

Now, thanks to these old-fashioned Christmas dessert recipes, you can introduce this enjoyable, age-old tradition to your holiday gathering.

Rich-Tasting Twelfth Night Cake Recipes

This authentic Twelfth cake recipe was once used commercially by the renowned English confectionery cook, Robert Wells of Scarborough. It is curated from “The Bread and Biscuit Baker’s and Sugar-Boiler’s Assistant” by Robert Wells, published by Crosby Lockwood and Son, London, in 1890.

Twelfth Night Cake:

1-1/4 lb of flour, 1 lb 2 oz of butter, 1 lb of moist sugar, 4 lb of currants, 1-1/2 lb of mixed peel, 2 nutmegs grated, 1/2 oz ground cinnamon, 10 eggs, 1/2 lb blanched sweet almonds cut in halves, and a wineglassful of brandy.

London Way of mixing Cakes:

Weigh down the flour and sugar on a clean smooth table, make a hole in it, and bank it well up; in this hole put your eggs; cream the butter in an earthenware pan; then add to the flour and sugar the eggs and butter; mix all together and beat up well with both hands. You may work it up this way as light as a feather; then add the currants, spices, etc.

In olden times, a bean and a pea were introduced into the cake to determine who should be the king and queen of the evening festivities.

Icing Recipe For Twelfth Cakes, Bride Cakes, Etc.

To make this take 2 lb of finely powdered icing sugar (first having an earthenware pan made warm), put in six fresh whites of eggs, and immediately whisk them, and as quickly as possible, until quite stiff; then add the sugar by degrees, whisking all the time. As soon as it appears light cease whisking, and beat it well with the spatter until you have put in all the sugar. A little tartaric acid or lemon juice may be added towards the end of the mixing.

To know when it is sufficiently beaten, take up a little on the spatter and let it drop into the basin again. If it keeps its shape it is ready; if it runs it is either beaten too little or requires more sugar.

Parkinson’s Twelfth Night Cake Recipe

This old-fashioned recipe for what was sometimes called an Epiphany cake is curated from “The Complete Confectioner, Pastry-Cook, and Baker” by Eleanor Parkinson, published by J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, in 1864.

Rich Twelfth, Pound Cakes, Or Bridle Cakes:

Butter two pounds twelve ounces, sugar one pound twelve ounces, currants five pounds, citron one pound and a-half, almonds six ounces; nutmegs, mace, and cinnamon, of equal parts, in powder, two ounces; eggs twenty, brandy half a pint — these proportions allow for the cake being iced.

If more sugar is preferred, the quantity must be the same as the butter; but less is used in this instance, that the cake may be light, and also to allow for the fruit, which would make it too sweet. Double the quantity of almonds may be used if required, as some persons prefer more.

Warm a smooth pan, large enough for the mixture; put in the butter, and reduce it to a fine cream, by working it about the pan with your hand. In summer the pan need not be warmed, as it can be reduced to a cream without; but in the winter keep the mixture as warm as possible, without oiling the butter. Add the sugar and mix it well with the butter, until it becomes white and feels light in the hand.

Break in two or three eggs at a time, and work the mixture well, before any more is added. Continue doing this until they are all used and it becomes light; then add the spirit, currants, peel, spice, and almonds, some or most of these being previously cut in thin slices, the peel having also been cut into small thin strips and bits. When these are incorporated, mix in the flour lightly; put it in a hoop with paper over the bottom and round the sides, and placed on a baking plate.

Large cakes require three or four pieces of stiff paper round the sides; and if the cake is very large, a pipe or funnel, made either of stiff paper or tin, and well buttered, should be put in the center, and the mixture placed round it; this is to allow the middle of the cake to be well-baked, otherwise, the edge would be burnt two or three inches deep before it could be properly done.

Place the tin plates containing the cake on another, the surface of which is covered an inch or two thick with sawdust or fine ashes to protect the bottom. Bake it in an oven at a moderate heat. The time required to bake it will depend on the state of the oven and the size of the cake.

When the cake is cold, proceed to ice it. (See icings for cakes below.) Wedding Cakes have generally, first, a coating on the top of almond icing; when this is dry, the sides and top are covered with royal or white icing. Fix on any gum paste or other ornaments whilst it is wet; and when dry, ornament it with piping, orange blossoms, ribbon, etc.; the surface and sides are often covered with small knobs of white sugar candy whilst the icing is wet.

Twelfth Cakes are iced with white or colored icing, and decorated with gum paste, plaster ornaments, piping paste, rings, knots, and fancy papers, etc., and piped.

Icing Recipe For Twelfth Night Cakes

Pound, and sift some treble-refined sugar through a fine sieve, and put it into an earthen pan, which must be free from grease; to each pound of sifted sugar add the whites of three eggs, or sufficient to make it into a paste of a moderate consistence, then with a wooden spoon or spatula beat it well, using a little lemon juice occasionally, and more white of egg if you find that it will bear it without making it too thin, until you have a nice light icing, which will hang to the sides of the pan and spoon; or, if it is dropped from the spoon, it should remain on the top without speedily losing the form it assumed.

A pan of icing, when well beat and finished, should contain as much again in bulk as it was at the commencement: use sufficient lemon juice to give the icing a slight acid, or it will scale off the cake in large pieces when it is cut.

Easy Twelfth Night Cake Recipe:

This historic recipe is curated from the book “Mrs. Goodfellow’s Cookery As It Should Be” by Mrs. Elizabeth Goodfellow, published by T. B. Peterson & Brothers, Philadelphia, in 1865.

Cream two pounds of butter and two pounds of sifted loaf sugar; take one large nutmeg grated, half an ounce of ground allspice, one teaspoonful of ground cinnamon, the same of ginger, the same of coriander seeds, and one wineglass of brandy; mix these well, then beat very light eighteen eggs; cut into thin slices half a pound of citron, and the grated rind of two lemons; beat this for at least half an hour until perfectly light; line the pan with buttered white paper, and bake in rather slow heat for four hours: when nearly cold, ice it as directed.

The Epiphany of the Magi

Illustration of Madonna and Child

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod, the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, saying, “Where is he that is born King of the Jews? For we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.”

And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary, his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him; and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts: gold, frankincense, and myrrh. —Book of Matthew 2: 1-2, 11

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#AceRecipeNews says Observe the traditional twelve days of Christmas at your house this year by celebrating Epiphany on January 6th, with a special cake made using these authentic Twelfth Night cake recipes.

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Rosca de Reyes (Kings’ Ring)


#AceFoodNews says found this and just had to post to my readers this recipe as we reach towards “Epiphany” called “Rosca De Reyes {kings Ring} but l am told it carries a beware – this is ” Beware, enjoying a slice of Rosca de Reyes carries with it a potential responsibility. Whomever finds a baby Jesus in the Rosca de Reyes must take it to the nearest church on February 2 (Día de la Candelaria). The finder of the Niño Dios (baby doll) has the responsibility to take the family as well to church and celebrate the presentation of Jesus in the Temple. According to the Jewish tradition, an infant is presented to God in the temple 40 days after his birth. Día de la Candelaria on February 2 means the Light of Christ presented to God. Nowadays, the people who get the figurines in their piece of the cake usually agree to make a party on February 2, and to provide the guests with tamales and atole. Once again, the combination of different religious practices creates another celebration. #chefs-tips

Galván Real Estate and Services

Image  A delicious and airy bread that is slightly sweet and topped with dried fruit, crumb topping and sugar. There are a couple plastic baby Jesus dolls hidden inside and tradition says that whoever finds it has to prepare the next holiday fiesta.

The bread is associated with the festival of Epiphany (January 6th) in the Christmas season. Catholic tradition states that the journey of the three kings to Bethlehem took twelve days (the Twelve Days of Christmas), and that they arrived to honor the Christ Child on Epiphany. The equation is 12 days after the birth of Christ. This is also the traditional day for children to receive their holiday gifts in some countries. Today many children receive gifts on Christmas and on Three Kings Days. This is one time when the merger of holiday celebrations is a bonus for the children of Mexico.

Beware, enjoying a slice of…

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