` People in this World starve and others are `Obese’ as `Greed’ has its own Reward’s’


#AceHealthNews says `Child Obesity looms large, with over a third of `European’ teenagers over-weight in Europe – WHO-Reports’

Published time: February 27, 2014 19:46.47

 
Reuters / Toby Melville Reuters / Toby Melville
One in three 11-year-olds is overweight or obese across Europe, a detailed analysis on obesity levels in 53 countries has shown. Action needs to be taken “to stop overweight becoming the new norm,” the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned.

Up to 27 percent of 13-year-olds and 33 percent of 11-year-olds in some European countries are overweight or obese, according to the WHO latest report. It’s believed that lack of exercise, as well as the “disastrously effective”marketing of unhealthy foods, high in fat, sugar and salt, has led to a sharp rise in obesity and overweight in recent decades. Among the countries with the highest proportion of overweight 11-year-olds is Greece (33 percent), Portugal (32 percent), and Ireland and Spain (30 percent each).

From 2002 to 2010, the number of countries where more than 20 percent of 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds are overweight rose from 5 to 11. 

Over 30 percent of boys and girls aged 15 and over in 23 out of 36 countries are not getting enough exercise. Among adults, women’s rates of poor physical activity span from 16 percent in Greece to 71 percent in Malta and 76 percent in Serbia. 

Thanks to restrictions on advertising of unhealthy foods, promoting vegetable and fruit consumption and physical activity in schools, France, Norway, Switzerland and the Netherlands appeared among the few champions who managed to stem the epidemic of overweight and obesity, however. 

National governments should enforce legislation, and insist on informative labeling, nutrient profiling and regulated marketing, requiring the food industry to take responsibility, the WHO recommended in its report.

In Britain, where according to official statistics most people are overweight or obese, (this includes 61.9 percent of adults and 28 percent of children aged between two and 15), on average the population consumes too much saturated fat. Intakes of the so-called non-milk extrinsic sugars exceed the recommended level for all age groups, most notably for children aged 11-18, where mean intakes provided 15.3 percent of food energy, according to the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey.

The epidemic of overweight and obesity threatens children’s health, since childhood obesity goes hand in hand with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, orthopedic problems, mental disorders, under achievement in school, as well as lower self-esteem. 

“Preventing children from becoming overweight or obese is vital to their avoiding the associated, lifelong health risks,” the United Nations health agency said.

Over 60 percent of children who are overweight before puberty will be so as young adults. Such children are three to seven times more likely to be overweight adults. 

“Our perception of what is normal has shifted. Being overweight is now more common than unusual,” the WHO’s regional director, Zsuzsanna Jakab, pointed out. 

We must not let another generation grow up with obesity as the new norm,” she added. 

Physical inactivity “coupled with a culture that promotes cheap, convenient food high in fats, salt and sugars – is deadly,” Jakab warned. Children need at least one hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity every day not to gain extra weight.

“We need to create environments where physical activity is encouraged and the healthy food choice is the default choice, regardless of social group,” a WHO expert on nutrition, physical activity and obesity, Joao Breda, said in a statement released with the report. 

“Physical activity and healthy food choices should be taken very seriously in all environments – schools, hospitals, cities, towns and workplaces. As well as the food industry, the urban planning sector can make a difference,” he added. 

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century, the WHO says. Globally, in 2010 the number of overweight children under the age of five, is estimated to be over 42 million. Close to 35 million of those live in developing countries.

 

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` Excess and Greed has its own way of showing People the Truth’


#AceFoodNews ‘Shameful’: `World loses up to a third of produced food, World Bank says and people still go Hungry’ 

Published time: February 27, 2014 18:49

 
Spencer Platt / Getty Images / AFP Spencer Platt / Getty Images / AFP
The world loses a staggering one-quarter to one-third of all food produced for human consumption, according to the World Bank’s quarterly Food Price Watch report, with the developed world leading the wastage.

The world is losing 25 to 33 percent of the food it produces – nearly 4 billion metric tons – according to estimates from the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Association (FAO) and the World Resources Institute.

In regions suffering from malnourished, such as Africa and South East Asia, this translates as 400 to 500 calories per person per day and in the developed world up to 1,520 calories.

Cereals were highlighted as representing more than half food lost or wasted at 53 percent by calorie content, but by weight fruits and vegetables represent the largest share of global food loss at 44 percent.

Most of the wastage takes place at the consumption stage (35 percent), followed by production and handling and storage (both 24 percent).

“The amount of food wasted and lost globally is shameful,” Jim Yong Kim, the president of the World Bank, said in a statement.

“Millions of people around the world go to bed hungry every night, and yet millions of tons of food end up in trash cans or spoiled on the way to market. We have to tackle this problem in every country in order to improve food security and to end poverty,” Kim added.

AFP Photo / Rajesh JantilalAFP Photo / Rajesh Jantilal

The report also found a substantial difference between the amount of food lost in developed and developing countries and across regions. 56 percent of food loss takes place in the developed world and only 44 percent in developing countries.

In North America, some 61 percent of food losses are in the consumption stage, for example food, which has been bought and then rots in refrigerators. In the US and the UK and average family of four wastes between $1,600 and $1,100 a year in food they buy but do not consume.

The authors blamed the policies of large supermarkets, which encourage overbuying by consumers as well as overproduction of some foods for sale.

In contrast, sub Saharan Africa lost just 5 percent of food at the consumption stage but vast amounts were lost during production and processing.

For example, the large amounts of water used to irrigate rice or roast coffee were deemed wasteful, especially if the end product is lost before it reaches the consumer.

The study found that there were large variations across countries. Although in the short-term, pressures in food prices are expected to weaken, weather conditions in Argentina, Australia and China, as well as higher oil prices, mean that food production will need constant monitoring.

The World Bank also set out how it intends to boost agriculture and agriculture-related investment; commitments in 2013 amounted to $8.1 billion.

Potential solutions to limit the amount of food wasted include changing agricultural production techniques and making suitable investments in transport and storage infrastructure as well as changing commercial and consumer behaviour in developed countries.

RT

 

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Yammie’s Noshery and baking Auntie Anne’s pretzels


#AceFoodNews says nice will give these a try #chefs-tips at #GoodFoodEveryDay

Lea Hogg's Blog

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The first food blog I started to follow was Yammie’s Noshery and that was after finding her recipe to make Auntie Anne’s pretzels about two years ago. I made them, we ate them. They were wonderful, tasting of New York, triggering many good memories. And I started to follow Yammie’s blog. She impresses me by her mature outlook to life. She is only 20 now.

We had an afternoon at mum’s yesterday, a relaxed afternoon of baking and eating. It nearly felt like turning back the clock, cementing the calendar watching my children happy in the garden, dogs and all the menagerie …. time … if only we can stop it, if only we have more of it, such a precious commodity …..

And time gave us a break yesterday and the afternoon stood still as I baked Auntie Anne’s pretzels. I made a few minor changes to Yammie’s recipe…

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