Spiced Candied Almonds


#AF&HN2014 says ” Nice one Shivaay” will give this one a try, for my next #SpecialOccasionParty

Shivaay Delights

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Sweet, spicy and a hint of chilli is the trio of flavour you will get with these candied almonds that crystallize as they cool down. The sugar flecks off of them with salt to lift the sweetness.

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Almonds are great for vitamin E and in turn for your skin and hair. What better way than to have them do a wonderful job for the body but also a taste sensation for our palettes!

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I used less sugar so that I got a crisp coating on the almond rather than a sticky one, I know I will be making these again! And very soon!!

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INGREDIENTS

1 cup whole almonds
½ cup granulated sugar
⅓ tsp mixed spice
pinch of red chilli powder
1 tbsp water
Sea Salt for sprinkling

METHOD

• Line a baking sheet with some greaseproof paper

• In a thick bottom base saucepan gently heat the sugar, water…

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Recipe for delicious sausage borscht


#AF&HN says ” Recipe for Sausage Borscht” #enjoy

Global News

Borscht is woefully underappreciated in America. This classic dish from Russia (and much of Eastern Europe, in fact) not only is a great way to eat a ton of vegetables, it also can be incredibly delicious.

But it generally has a bad reputation. People think of it as a cold, stringy and mostly bland soup. While it can be served cold, that’s by no means the rule. And as for the stringy and bland part, no way. Borscht can get a stringy or mushy texture if it’s overcooked. But so can pasta, so it’s really just a matter of paying attention.

And if you’ve had a bland borscht, you just haven’t had a good one. The key is to start it off right – a nicely sauteed onion and spicy pork sausage. They add tons of flavour and a great hit of protein that makes this a substantial soup that…

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Roasted pepper, caramelised onion & feta bread


#AF&HN2014

Shivaay Delights

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An all in one Mediterranean bread with exciting ingredients that blend so well together. The charred juicy pepper, the sweet and sour caramelised onion along with a hint of saltiness from the feta cheese makes this bread something very special, even though I do say so myself! Lovely with a light soup or just with a little butter on its own. I will definitely be experimenting more with these flavours and more breads are still to come!

INGREDIENTS

1 medium white onion sliced crescents
1/2 tbsp olive oil for onion
1/2 tsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp balsamic vinegar
1 red bell pepper
1 clove garlic crushed
30-40g feta cheese diced or crumbled
250g plain flour
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
2 eggs lightly beaten
100ml milk
100ml olive oil
Oil and flour for pan

METHOD

1. To roast the red bell pepper, preheat oven to 200c/400f/gas mark 6…

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#Chefs-tip : “Healthy Eating Bok Choy Recipe”


#AceRecipeNews says a little used and rarely tired is”Bok Choy” abd it is good and full of nutrition, so thought a simple 4 minute, recipe is in order.

Enjoy this great tasting recipe and get 375% of your Daily Value for vitamin A, 318% DV for vitamin C, 188% DV for vitamin K and 69% for folate!

4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy Prep and Cook Time: 10 minutesIngredients:

  • 1 lb bok choy, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 3 TBS low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 3 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • 5 drops soy sauce
  • sea salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional:
  • 1 TBS grated ginger
  • 2 TBS tofu, cubed
  • toasted sesame seeds

Directions:

  1. Chop bok choy and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health-promoting properties.
  2. In a stainless steel heat broth. When it begins to steam add bok choy and healthy saute, Healthy Sauté for 4 minutes.
  3. Toss with garlic, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste and any of the optional ingredients you would like to include.

Serves 2

Nutritional Profile

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
(280.93 grams)
Calories: 218
NutrientDRI/DV
 vitamin A337.8%
 vitamin C141.3%
 vitamin K90.2%
 folate37.7%
 vitamin B627.6%
 calcium24.2%
 manganese19.5%

Introduction to Recipe Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify recipes that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Recipe Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the recipes that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the recipe doesn’t contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this recipe’s in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients – not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good – please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you’ll need to glance back up to see the ingredients used in the recipe and the number of serving sizes provided by the recipe. Our nutrient ratings are based on a single serving. For example, if a recipe makes 4 servings, you would be receiving the nutrient amounts listed in the chart by eating 1/4th of the combined ingredients found in the recipe. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this recipe and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration‘s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

4-Minute Healthy sautéed Bok Choy
1.00 serving
280.93 grams
Calories: 218
Nutrient Amount DRI/DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
vitamin A 10134.87 IU 337.8 27.9 excellent
vitamin C 106.04 mg 141.4 11.7 excellent
vitamin K 81.19 mcg 90.2 7.4 excellent
folate 151.00 mcg 37.8 3.1 good
vitamin B6 0.47 mg 27.6 2.3 good
calcium 242.59 mg 24.3 2.0 good
manganese 0.39 mg 19.5 1.6 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DRI/DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DRI/DV>=10%
very good DRI/DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DRI/DV>=5%
good DRI/DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DRI/DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for 4-Minute Healthy Sautéed Bok Choy

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#Chefs-tip ” Meat Is Difficult to Digest – Especially for the Elderly”


#AceFoodNews says l receive a number of interesting articles everyday ,but checking them out l find a lot are not as good as they seem. Those that read my posts will know l try to provide best advice. Anyway here is one that l had sent to me to print. It is courtesy of George Matejlan and his Foundation.

MeatSimply called:

Meat:

In comparison to many other foods, yes, meat can be difficult to digest. Meat is protein-dense animal muscle, and, in comparison to many other foods, for optimal digestion it requires better chewing, more acid secretion by the stomach’s parietal cells, and more active enzyme secretion by the pancreas. None of these factors mean that meat consumption should be avoided, however. Low-fat meats can make excellent additions to a meal plan, if eaten in moderation, even though many individuals choose to avoid meat for a variety of different reasons. I should also note here that fat itself can be difficult to digest, and you will be complicating your digestive challenges if you choose to eat meat that is higher in fat.

I’d encourage special attention to chewing in the case of meat, as well as to the cutting of the meat into small, bite-sized pieces. The overnight marinating of meat in an acid-containing marinade (for example, a marinade containing vinegar) can also increase its digestibility. In the hospital, when a person’s digestive system is particularly weak, meat is almost always blended or pure’ed to make it easier to digest. While few of us would want to go that far in improving meat’s digestibility, the idea of special attention to small bites and thorough chewing follows this same basic principle of improved digestibility.

Some people require meat and animal-based foods as part of their diet in order to maintain their optimal health, while others do not. If you are going to eat meat, eating it in small amounts may be wise in terms of allowing for optimal digestion. Additionally, I would highly suggest seeking out organically raised meats (and dairy products), when possible, as these do not contain residues of compounds, such as hormones and other drugs, which may be present in their conventionally raised counterparts.

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#Chefs-tip: “Too Much White Sugar in your Diet can Cause Real Problems”


#AceFoodNews says very rarely do l recommend a #mustread post, but this one from the “Guardian” just needed to be posted.

United Nations World Health Organisation logo

United Nations World Health Organisation logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 2012, the United Nations World Health Assembly advocated a significant new health goal: to reduce avoidable deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory disease kill 35 million per year. The UN has identified tobacco, alcohol and poor diet as central risk factors. The first two have been regulated by governments in order to protect public health, but poor diet is actually responsible formore disease than smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity combined.

But what component of the western diet should be targeted? The evidence suggesting that added sugar should be the target is now overwhelming. Unlike fat and protein, refined sugars offer no nutritional value and, contrary to what the food industry want you to believe, the body does not require any carbohydrate from added sugar for energy. Thus it is a source of completely unnecessary calories.

Sugars are added to the majority of processed foods in the UK. Yet disturbingly, many consumers are unaware of its presence in such large quantities. In the UK and Europe guideline daily amounts for sugar have not been updated since 2003. These obsolete guidelines still suggest one can consume a staggering 22 teaspoons of sugar daily.

World Health Organization Regions.

World Health Organization Regions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The World Health Organisation has recently been advised by scientific experts that added sugar or, more specifically, non-milk extrinsic sugar should constitute no more than 5% of energy. That would give a limit to the average man of a maximum of eight teaspoons a day and the average woman to six tea spoons a day. And that would include sugars fromfruit juice and honey.

The misleading labelling and health claims on “low-fat” foods that actually have shocking levels of sugar added is a scandal. Worse still, it has created the perfect storm for public health. Therefore, last Thursday, a group of UK and international experts, including myself, launched Action On Sugar. The main aim is to pressure the food industry to reduce added sugar in foods by 40% over four years. That would mean 100 fewer calories per person, which according to the UK Department of Health would reverse the obesity epidemic.

Health

Health (Photo credit: 401(K) 2013)

However, the industry remains in denial. Barbara Gallani, director of regulation at the Food and Drink Federation, made a statement of immediate resistance, denying sugar’s role in obesity and failing to acknowledge the multitude of scientific studies to the contrary. We mustn’t forget that it took 50 years from when the first scientific studies between smoking and lung cancer were made before any effective legislation was introduced through regulation. Why? Because Big Tobacco very successfully adopted a corporate strategy of denial. By planting doubt, confusing the public, bribing political allies and even buying the loyalty of rogue scientists.

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician an...

English: Andrew Lansley, British politician and Shadow Secretary of State for Health, speaking at the Health Hotel reception at the Manchester Central Conference Centre during the Conservative Party Conference 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The comparisons with the sugar industry are quite chilling. Leader of the Commons Andrew Lansley‘s aggressive intervention in parliament on Thursday was thus intriguing. He attempted to rubbish respected public health expert Professor Simon Capewell’s statement that sugar is the new tobacco. Lansley then compounded his errors by ignorantly asserting in the House that “sugar is essential to food”. It is not. He would have been more accurate in saying “sugar is essential to food industry profits and lining the pockets of its co-opted partners”. Lansley was a paid director of marketing company Profero to the end of 2009. Profero’s clients have included Pepsi, Mars, Pizza Hut and Diageo’s Guinness.

During his unhappy time as health secretary, Lansley promoted his brainchild, the Responsibility Deal. There, he invited fast-food companies in for cosy discussions on how to tackle obesity, cynically generating the impression of progress, but only achieving weak and meaningless voluntary calorie reduction pledges.

The food industry spends billions in junk food and sugary drink advertising, targeting the most vulnerable members of society, including children. Worse, the industry cynically associates fitness and sport with junk food and sugary drinks. Thus Mars is one of the official sponsors of the England football team. Yet one regular sized bar contains eight teaspoons of sugar, almost triple the amount recommended as a limit for a four- to eight-year-old child by the US Department of Health and Human Services’ dietary guidelines. The commonest cause of chronic pain in children is tooth decay with sugar as the number one risk factor. Regular physical activity has a multitude of health benefits; however, its effect on sustained weight loss is often weak. Furthermore, activity levels have changed little in the past 30 years as obesity has rocketed.

We are all vulnerable, because you don’t have to be overweight to be affected by diet-related disease. Of all the chronic diseases, type 2 diabetes, which is entirely preventable, is perhaps the most damaging. Diabetes increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, eye disease and leg amputations. Up to half of all diabetic patients go on to suffer acute or chronic pain, and two-thirds will ultimately develop dementia. The direct and indirect costs to the UK of diabetes is over £24bn and projected to approach £40bn by 2030. If we do nothing, this will cripple the NHS.

How does sugar compare to tobacco? A teaspoon of sugar or one cigarette will not harm you. But over time, the habit can be fatal. Unlike Big Tobacco, Big Sugar deliberately targets children. And added sugar has become so pervasive within the food environment that we can’t avoid it even if we wanted to. It is thus not simply a matter of personal choice. But perhaps most disturbing of all the similarities is the financial and political muscle that both industries have exerted to try to protect their profits, at the expense of our health. It’s time to wind back the harms of too much sugar, reverse the “diabesity” epidemic and the unspeakable suffering it causes. It’s time for Action On Sugar.

Dr Aseem Malhotra, a London cardiologist, is the science director of Action on Sugar

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

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