“Detoxify Your Body with Detoxifying Mint Tea”


#AceFoodNews says need to detoxify after all that #ChristmasFayre then maybe this simple blending of “Herbal Tea” maybe just the ticket #chef-tips

Courtesy of: Heidi Swanson at: 101 Cookbooks

heidi101_101ymlplogo.jpg Blending your own herbal tea is a revelation. Once you start, it’s hard to go back to tea bags. This way, you’re able to shape your blends to be as simple or complex as you like. You control the flavour profile and ingredients entirely, it’s great. I liken it to making your own soup versus buying canned soup, and tend to bounce around from one blend to another. For a stretch it was this turmeric tea, lately it has been this detox-y ginger mint blend. The tea is green-tasting from mint and coriander, and fennel-sweet. The layered peppery-ness comes from black peppercorns and freshly muddled ginger, and with all sorts of beneficial goodness in it – lemon, cumin, the fresh ginger – it just feels good going down. You can pre-blend the dry ingredients and keep the in a small jar on the counter, making it easy to brew a cup. This pot made the drive to Big Sur with me. I poured it in a thermos, slipped it in my weekend bag, and sipped my way down the coast where we did some Christmas hiking (and surprise whale watching!). …

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Christmas Day desserts: profiteroles and meringue cake


#AceFoodNews says l was given some “Vacherin Cheese”, have you tried it? But l also used to work at a bakery – many moons ago and made these for a company called “Alveston Kitchens” and there contracts would include M&S, Trust House Forte to name but two.

” Mint Garbanzo Bean Salad”


#AceFoodNews says “Start The New Year Off With A Healthy Meal That Is Full Of Nutrition”

Today’s Recipe: Copyright © 2013 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

If you don’t know what to serve for dinner tonight

This salad can be kept in your refrigerator for a few days getting more flavourful as it marinates. It’s a great lunch or dinner addition to your Healthiest Way of Eating.

Minted Garbanzo Bean Salad

Minted Garbanzo Bean SaladPrep and Cook Time: 15 Minutes:

Ingredients:

  • 2 medium fresh tomatoes, seeds and excess pulp removed, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 cups peeled diced cucumber, (cut lengthwise and scoop out seeds), diced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 medium onion, finely minced
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 2 cups garbanzo beans or 1 15oz can garbanzo beans(BPA free), rinsed and drained well
  • 3 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2-1/2 TBS chopped fresh mint
  • 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 medium head romaine lettuce, use tender whole leaves for bed

Directions:

  1. Mince onion and press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their health-promoting benefits.
  2. Mix all ingredients except lettuce together and chill. This is best if it chills for at least 15 minutes. Serve on a bed of lettuce.

Serves 4

#AceHealthNews

Copyright © 2013 The George Mateljan Foundation, All Rights Reserved

 

FDA Warns Consumers Against Body-Building Supplement


#AceHealthNews – ALERT says “FDA Warns Against Mass Destruction Dietary Supplement ” as stimulating muscle growth has side affects – namely “Synthetic Steroids” Read More and Stop Now ” #YouHaveBeenWarned

Health News / Tips & Trends / Celebrity Health

man-taking-pill-400x400

FRIDAY, Dec. 27, 2013 (HealthDay News) — Consumers should not use Mass Destruction, a dietary supplement used to stimulate muscle growth, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Monday.

The body-building product, available in retail stores, fitness gyms and online, contains potentially harmful synthetic steroids and anyone currently using it should stop immediately, the FDA said.

The warning was prompted by a report from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services involving a serious injury related to use of Mass Destruction. A healthy 28-year-old man who used the product for several weeks experienced liver failure, which required a transplant, according to the FDA.

“Products marketed as supplements that contain anabolic steroids pose a real danger to consumers,” Howard Sklamberg, director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. “The FDA is committed to ensuring that products…

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“Hospital Food That Has More Salt Than A Big Mac”


#AceFoodNews says according to the latest "British Medical Journal report by Katherine Jenner who chairs the campaign for "Better Hospital Food" which surveyed the nutritional content of 25 patients meals in the UK, and found 15 of them contained more salt than a Big Mac.

"A staggering two thirds of hospital staff say that they would not be happy to eat the food that they serve to patients," Jenner writes.

The problem isn’t limited to the U.K., suggests a Canadian study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers analysed patient meals at three hospitals in Ontario and found that their sodium content exceeded the recommended daily intake 100 percent of the time.

Even convicted criminals may have better culinary options. In a U.K. study from earlier this year, published in the journal Appetite, researchers noted that "prisoners are often better nourished than hospital patients" — even though hospital food has more funding. They observed how during the long process of food distribution in hospitals "hot food often cooled," "cold food became tepid," and many meals became dried out and discoloured.

If you want to get sick without also suffering through terrible food, try Switzerland: A survey of patients at two Swiss hospitals found that 85 percent were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their food and 75 percent said it tasted good (that’s better than some Yelp-rated restaurants).

Hospital meals in the U.S.

The U.K.’s hospital food is closely monitored because it’s a part of their national healthcare system, which is run by the government. In the U.S., hospital food is determined by individual institutions.

"They each have to develop a diet manual for their facility and then follow it," Diana Vaca McGhie of the American Heart Association told Business Insider in an email.

But that doesn’t mean it’s tastier or healthier than U.K. hospital offerings. Specific information on hospital meals here is harder to find than it is in Europe and Canada, likely because our healthcare system is still largely private.

There was one 1996 letter co-authored by Marion Nestle in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) that offers some clues. In short: Things don’t look much better here.

The authors looked at patient menus from 65 American teaching hospitals. Only four of them met all seven of the National Research Council’s dietary recommendations. Eighty-one percent had more than the recommended daily intake of cholesterol, and more than half had too much sodium.

Those things probably haven’t changed much in the past 17 years. Any changes may have been for the worse since hospital costs are rising and budgets are continually being slashed.

Still, not everyone thinks there’s a problem, and the NEJM report prompted some spirited replies. One responder, a nurse named Carol Porter from San Francisco, pointed out that certain "unhealthy" meals are offered specifically because sick patients sometimes need the extra calories:

The provocative conclusions only lead the media and the public to conclude that we are a bunch of dunces who have no understanding of the relation between nutrition and disease prevention.

This transmission is intended for the named addressee(s) only and may contain sensitive or protectively marked material up to RESTRICTED and should be handled accordingly. Unless you are the named addressee (or authorised to receive it for the addressee) you may not copy or use it, or disclose it to anyone else. If you have received this transmission in error please notify the sender immediately.

“Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing and Gravy with Fresh Herbs”


#AceFoodNews says here is a different slant on the Traditional Turkey Recipe‘s and courtesy of George Mateljan and his Foundation, and as he says holidays are usually the time we throw caution to the wind when it comes to what we eat. But you can enjoy the holidays without compromising health with our Healthy Holiday menu which has less fat and fewer calories—one-third fewer calories!

Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing & Gravy with Fresh Herbs Prep and Cook Time:Ingredients:

Directions: Stuffing:

  1. Bring 3-1/2 cups of lightly salted water to a boil. While water is coming to a boil, rinse the wild rice under running water in a strainer. When water is boiling add both wild and brown rice, cover, turn heat to low and cook for about 45 minutes, until tender. Do not overcook. You will most likely have excess water when rice is cooked properly. Put cooked rice in a strainer and drain out excess water. Set aside in a large enough bowl to mix everything together.
  2. Heat 1 TBS chicken broth in a large stainless steel skillet. Healthy Sauté onion in broth over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and celery and continue to sauté for another 2-3 minutes.
  3. Mix all the stuffing ingredients together in bowl and season with salt and pepper.Always stuff the turkey just before roasting—never ahead of time—to avoid the growth of harmful bacteria. Have the stuffing hot and pack it loosely in the body cavity.

Turkey:

  1. Rinse turkey well inside and out. Pat dry. (If you had to buy a frozen turkey, make sure it is completely thawed.)
  2. Preheat your oven to 350°F (177°C) and put the oven rack on the bottom shelf. Right before roasting the turkey, stuff it loosely with the stuffing.
  3. Cut about 48 inches of heavy kitchen twine. Truss the turkey by first binding the legs together with the center of the length of twine. Run the twine along the sides of the turkey toward the neck tightly holding the wings to its sides with the twine. Cross the twine around the neck end of the bird and back to the legs. Loop around legs and tie a knot. Rub the turkey with a little salt and pepper.
  4. Place turkey breast side down on a flat or V-shaped rack in roasting pan. Make sure you use a rack inside the roasting pan. Otherwise the skin may stick to the pan and tear. Add a cup of chicken broth to the bottom of the pan. Roast breast side down, basting about every 30 minutes with the pan juices for about 2-1/2 hours for a 12-15 lb turkey.
  5. Bring turkey to the top of the stove, turn it to its back and remove the trussing twine. This will now allow the inside of the legs to brown along with the rest of the turkey. Baste again, and return to the oven. But first, check the breast for doneness by inserting an instant reading thermometer at the thickest part of the breast toward the neck. This will give you an idea how much longer the turkey will need to cook. It should read about 125°F (52°C) at this point. When the thermometer reads between 1657°F and 170°F (74-77°C) in the thickest part of the thigh the turkey is perfectly done. Check the stuffing by inserting the thermometer into the center of the cavity. The stuffing should read 165°F (74°C) to be done. If it has not reached this temperature, you will have to remove it from the turkey and finish cooking it in a baking pan on its own. It’s important the stuffing reaches this temperature to be safe to eat. Check the thighs for doneness. Remove your turkey to a platter, but don’t carve it for at least 20 minutes.

Gravy:

  1. Simmer all the ingredients except oat flour, thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper for about 1 hour on medium heat.
  2. Strain and discard solids. Heat 1/4 cup broth in a stainless steel skillet. Whisk in flour a little at a time to incorporate. Using a wire whisk, add the rest of the broth a little at a time on low heat. Keep whisking to avoid lumps until all the liquid is incorporated.
  3. Add rosemary and cook for another 20 minutes on low heat, stirring occasionally. Season with chopped thyme, salt, and pepper.

Nutritional Profile

Nutrients in
Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing & Herbed Gravy
1.00 serving (308.02 grams)
Nutrient%Daily Value
 selenium199.6%
 vitamin A162.1%
 vitamin B12148.3%
 tryptophan87.5%
 manganese86%
 protein53%
 vitamin B244.7%
 vitamin B340.7%
 phosphorus40.2%
 folate37.3%
 vitamin K34.7%
 zinc32.6%
 iron30.7%
 vitamin B629.5%
 copper28.9%
 vitamin B527.9%
 potassium26.6%
 magnesium25.6%
Calories (540)30%

Introduction to Recipe Rating System Chart

In order to better help you identify recipes that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Recipe Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the recipes that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing & Gravy with Fresh Herbs is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the recipe doesn’t contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this recipe’s in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients – not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good – please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you’ll need to glance back up to see the ingredients used in the recipe and the number of serving sizes provided by the recipe. Our nutrient ratings are based on a single serving. For example, if a recipe makes 4 servings, you would be receiving the nutrient amounts listed in the chart by eating 1/4th of the combined ingredients found in the recipe. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents, the nutrient density that we calculated for this recipe and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s “Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling.” Read more background information and details of our rating system.

Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing & Herbed Gravy
1.00 serving
308.02 grams
540.41 calories
Nutrient Amount DV
(%)
Nutrient
Density
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
selenium 139.74 mcg 199.6 6.6 excellent
vitamin A 8109.70 IU 162.2 5.4 excellent
vitamin B12 8.90 mcg 148.3 4.9 excellent
tryptophan 0.28 g 87.5 2.9 excellent
manganese 1.72 mg 86.0 2.9 excellent
protein 26.50 g 53.0 1.8 very good
vitamin B2 0.76 mg 44.7 1.5 good
vitamin B3 8.15 mg 40.8 1.4 good
phosphorus 402.33 mg 40.2 1.3 good
folate 149.38 mcg 37.3 1.2 good
vitamin K 27.81 mcg 34.8 1.2 good
zinc 4.90 mg 32.7 1.1 good
iron 5.54 mg 30.8 1.0 good
vitamin B6 0.59 mg 29.5 1.0 good
copper 0.58 mg 29.0 1.0 good
vitamin B5 2.79 mg 27.9 0.9 good
potassium 931.76 mg 26.6 0.9 good
magnesium 102.58 mg 25.6 0.9 good
World’s Healthiest
Foods Rating
Rule
excellent DV>=75% OR
Density>=7.6 AND DV>=10%
very good DV>=50% OR
Density>=3.4 AND DV>=5%
good DV>=25% OR
Density>=1.5 AND DV>=2.5%

Courtesy of W.H Whole-Foods In-Depth Nutritional Profile: Read More:

Holiday Turkey with Rice Stuffing & Gravy with Fresh Herbs

 

“Christmas Eve Pasta – Shrimp Lemon Pepper Linguini”


Christmas Eve Pasta – Shrimp Lemon Pepper Linguini

#AceGuestNews and Views courtesy of Author: Lyndsay Wells Lyndsay Wells is a professional trainer, writer, and program developer with a passion for food and cooking. She is an award-winning recipe developer, and a website ambassador for Kraft Foods Canada. Lyndsay believes cooking should be approachable and easy and has great tips and ideas for putting together sophisticated looking dishes that cooks of all levels can accomplish.
One of my favourite movies over the Christmas season is The Holiday starring Cameron Diaz and  Kate Winslett. Not only is the English cottage setting for one of the story lines enchanting, the second story line, which takes place in Los Angeles, is equally magical because both stories blossom into love – and what could  be more wonderful over the holidays than that?

Especially when my two favourite characters indulge in a Christmas Eve tradition that is simply lovely: Christmas Eve pasta.

As I said in my last post, this year my husband and I have rented a romantic winter cottage for the holidays and on Christmas Eve, in honour of The Holiday, I will be making this dish for two!

Succulent prawns are enveloped in a buttery herb and  lemon wine sauce and tossed with linguini or spaghetti pasta. Serve this with crusty bread and chilled Proseco and toast the season in style!

Visit the printable recipe here: Shrimp Lemon Pepper Linguini

Please enjoy the easy to follow step by step video.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Serves: 4 – Recipe easily doubles

Ingredients 

  • 1 (8 ounce) package linguine or spaghetti pasta
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
  • salt to taste
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add linguine, and cook for 9 to 13 minutes or until al dent’e; drain.
  2. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat, and saute garlic about 1 minute. Mix in chicken broth, wine, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, and pepper. Reduce heat, and simmer until liquid is reduced by about 1/2.
  3. Mix shrimp, butter, parsley, and basil into the saucepan. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, until shrimp is opaque. Stir in the cooked linguine, and continue cooking 2 minutes, until well coated.


 

New study shows microplastics are harmful and impact health – Policies in need of change


#AceHealthNews says l have a real theory like so many about this substance and its consistency ,as if you heat it the smell is overpowering and if you rub your finger over the inside of a hot plastic kettle, some white or coloured powder comes off in your hand. Now call me alarmist but in cups of tea ” UK’s Best Drink of the Day” we must ingest it #plasticnotgood

digger666

via New study shows microplastics are harmful and impact health  – Policies in need of change – FUTURISTECH INFO.

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With global production of plastic exceeding 280 metric tons every year, a fair amount of the stuff is bound to make its way to the natural environment. However, until now researchers haven’t known whether ingested plastic transfers chemical additives or pollutants to wildlife. A new study conducted by an NCEAS researcher shows that toxic concentrations of pollutants and additives enter the tissue of animals that have eaten microplastic. The findings are published today in Current Biology.

There were two primary objectives for the study: to look at whether chemicals from microplastic move into the tissues of organisms; and to determine any impacts on the health and the functions that sustain biodiversity. Lab experiments exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5 percent microplastic (polyvinylchloride) that also contained common chemical pollutants…

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Nanosponge based vaccines are capable of blocking effects of MRSA


#AceHealthNews says this is very interesting especially the part about “Staphylococcus Aureus” as this is a real problem in food preparation and as our organisations chef says she will check this out! #healthandfood

digger666

 via Nanosponge based vaccines are capable of blocking effects of MRSA – FUTURISTECH INFO.

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Nanosponges that soak up a dangerous toxin produced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) could serve as a safe and effective vaccine against this toxin. This “nanosponge vaccine” enabled the immune systems of mice to block the adverse effects of the alpha-haemolysin toxin from MRSA—both within the bloodstream and on the skin. Nanoengineers from the University of California, San Diego described the safety and efficacy of this nanosponge vaccine in the Dec. 1 issue of Nature Nanotechnology.

The nanosponges at the foundation of the experimental “toxoid vaccine” platform are bio-compatible particles made of a polymer core wrapped in a red-blood-cell membrane. Each nanosponge’s red-blood-cell membrane seizes and detains the Staphylococcus aureus (staph) toxin alpha-haemolysin without compromising the toxin’s structural integrity through heating or chemical processing. These toxin-studded nanosponges served as…

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“Unique Chicken Idea’s from John Torode”


English: 4 lb. chicken cooked at 325 deg F for...

English: 4 lb. chicken cooked at 325 deg F for 1.75 hrs by indirect cooking (beer can chicken) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceFoodNews says John Torode’s take on “Beer Can Chicken” just for a laugh this Christmas.

Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) whole chicken
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons of your favorite dry spice rub
1 can beer
Directions: 

Remove neck and giblets from chicken and discard. Rinse chicken inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Rub chicken lightly with oil then rub inside and out with salt, pepper and dry rub. Set aside.

Open beer can and take several gulps (make them big gulps so that the can is half full). Place beer can on a solid surface. Grabbing a chicken leg in each hand, plunk the bird cavity over the beer can. Transfer the bird-on-a-can to your grill and place in the center of the grate, balancing the bird on its 2 legs and the can like a tripod.
Cook the chicken over medium-high, indirect heat (i.e. no coals or burners on directly under the bird), with the grill cover on, for approximately 1 1/4 hours or until the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F in the breast area and 180 degrees F in the thigh, or until the thigh juice runs clear when stabbed with a sharp knife. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.

Read more at:GFN