Almond Cake Recipe from Mrs Beatons’ 1887 Household Management Book ‘ – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Sept.25: I personally have this book and it’s a pleasure to provide this recipe for Almond Cake Recipe courtesy of // Love Vintage Recipes

This Almond Cake Recipe is from the Mrs Beaton 1887 Household management book.She has some great recipes in it, and lots of household tips on how to run a home in Victorian Britain 1887. I will be concentrating on the recipes from this book in my next posts. I hope you all enjoy them.
Almond Cake

Almond Cake Recipe 1865

Ingredients–half a pound of sweet almonds, 1 oz of bitter almonds, 6 eggs, 8 tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar, 5 tablespoonfuls of fine flour, the grated rind of 1 lemon, 3 oz of butter.
Method—–Blanch and pound the almonds to a paste; separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs; beat the later, and add to the almonds. Stir in the sugar, flour, and lemon -rind; add the butter, which should be beaten to a cream; and when all these ingredients are well mixed, put in the whites of the eggs, which should be whisked to a stiff froth. Butter a cake mould, put in the mixture, and bake in a good oven from 1 to 2 hours. Enjoy #ChefCJ

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

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There is nothing like Homemade Pita Bread – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Sept.10: I wish as a chef l had more time to post great recipes and articles but just finished a stint on another contract: So here’s one l made earlier and one of my favourites – There is nothing like homemade bread and this is nothing like homemade bread it’s MUCH MUCH BETTER take a look Kitchen Basics: Homemade Pita Bread // Love and Olive Oil enjoy . #ChefCJ

Homemade Pita Bread

Have you ever wondered where the pocket in the pita comes from? I mean, how does it get there?

Magic.

No, really.

Homemade Pita Bread Puffing in the oven

It’s mesmerizing, isn’t it?

Seriously though, I could watch this on repeat all. day. long.

It’s almost as therapeutic as kneading bread dough (big edible stress ball, right? Or maybe that’s just me).

How to Make Homemade Pita Bread

Homemade pita is surprisingly easy, and you’ll be in awe when your flat little pieces of dough magically puff up in the oven like little yeasty clouds. They’re as entertaining to make as they are to eat.

How to Make Homemade Pita Pockets

Homemade pita is like night and day when compared to the stale and flavorless store bought versions. Made with mostly all-purpose flour but with a bit of whole wheat for added texture and flavor (and you can increase the proportion of whole wheat flour too, up to 1 cup, as long as the overall amount of flour stays the same), plus a little bit of honey for added sweetness.

Trust me, the next time you make Gyros or (my favorite) Greek Turkey Tacos, try using homemade pita instead. It only takes a little bit of extra time and is so worth the extra effort.

Get the full recipe and step-by-step instructions on the Kitchenthusiast blog »

Read the Rest —Kitchen Basics: Homemade Pita Bread

© Love & Olive Oil

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

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Fish lovers are facing a price hike due to increased demand, falling global catches and impending legislation to protect sustainability, according to a report from analysts Mintec – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Aug.28: Price of tuna could rocket due to demand and restrictions on fishing

Skipjack tuna is in short supply (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)
Skipjack tuna is in short supply (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

You may have to pay a little extra for your tuna in the future.

Skipjack prices rocketed this year following a disagreement that stopped US tuna vessels from fishing, which reduced supply.

That meant demand for yellowfin, which is often used as a substitute for skipjack, went up.

Trade magazine The Grocer warned new controls to protect sustainability could mean the cost of tuna rose even further.

‘The new control measures will further limit the current low catches, helping wild tuna stocks recover,’ Mintec analyst Emma-Jayne Smith told the Grocer.

‘This is likely to drive prices higher over the next six months, along with falling catches for alternative tuna species and rising exports to emerging markets.’

The Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission will decide in October if it will issue a temporary ban on tuna fishing in the Eastern Pacific.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

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#ProfitB4People – Our food system is rigged by corporate food industry who are taking desperate steps to fight animal reforms and consumers suffer with lowering of standards for profit – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Aug.24: Our food system is rigged: How the corporate food industry is taking desperate steps to fight animal reforms

India Monsoon Agriculture

An Indian farmer prepares rice saplings for replanting in a paddy field during monsoon rains on the outskirts of Mumbai, Maharashtra state, India, Tuesday, July 21, 2015. Monsoon rains are crucial for Indian agriculture, because nearly 60 percent of its farmland is rainfed. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool) (Credit: Rafiq Maqbool)

This article originally appeared on AlterNet.

AlterNet

From “battery” cages in egg production to excessive antibiotics, food activists are fighting some of the worst “farm ” practices. California’s Proposition 2, for example, outlawed caged (“battery”) egg production as of 2015. “Just because they are certain to end up on a dinner plate or in a barn producing eggs…doesn’t obviate the need to treat them humanely during their short lives,” read a Prop. 2 LA Times editorial about chickens.

But Big Food is fighting back. Out of state battery egg producers who sold eggs to California that are no longer legal brought suit against Prop 2. When the FDA tried to ban cephalosporin antibiotics, the egg, chicken, turkey, dairy, pork and cattle industries stormed Capitol Hill and won. And now, Big Food is claiming that “aviary”egg systems that replace battery systems are worse — and that antibiotics in egg production are just fine.

Antibiotics are “green” say factory farmers

As AlterNet has reported, more than 70 percent of medically important antibiotics are not used in people but in livestock. They are given to make animals grow faster — less feed is required — and to compensate for overcrowded, unsanitary factory farm conditions, not to treat sick animals. While Big Food and Big Pharma deny it, such routine ag use causes antibiotic resistant bacteria according to every leading medical organization. Superbugs, antibiotic resistant bacteria, hospitalize two million a year in the United States and kill 23,000 according to the CDC.

But wrestling antibiotics out of factory farmers’ hands has been a difficult prospect because they represent huge profits to Big Food and Big Pharma. For example, it took the FDA ten years to get Bayer to quit using dangerous fluoroquinolones in poultry water. And when the FDA tried to ban cephalosporins in 2008, Big Food said it couldn’t “farm” without them.

Now, even though almost all major U.S. poultry producers have pledged to reduce or eliminate antibiotics because of consumer opposition, Sanderson Farms, the country’s third largest poultry producer, says they are just fine. Not only are ag antibiotics not responsible for antibiotic resistant bacteria, says Sanderson, they are downright green and the poultry giant will not eliminate them despite marketing pressure. “We have decided we’re not going to sacrifice our environmental goals, our animal welfare goals or our food safety goals for marketing purposes,” says a new pro-antibiotic ad campaign from Sanderson.

How do antibiotics further Sanderson environmental goals? Without them “we would need more corn, more water, more soybean meal, more housing, more electricity,” because animals couldn’t be crowded together said Lampkin Butts, the Sanderson president and chief operating officer. How do antibiotics further Sanderson animal welfare goals? Without the drugs keeping chickens alive, more would die says Butts.

Calling drug and biotech farming in which more product is squeezed out of each, individual animal “green” is not a new Big Food tactic. Do you remember Monsanto’s recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) which got more milk out of each cow at the price of udder infections, more antibiotics and a shortened life? “Fewer cows means less methane produced by bovine intestinal tracts, and manure production is cut by about 3.6 million tons” per year said a proXrBGH oped. “At the same time, more than 5.5 million gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel (enough to power 8,800 homes) are saved, greenhouse gas emissions are lowered by 30,000 metric tons.”

Two years ago, Elanco, Eli Lilly’s animal division, rolled out a similar “squeezing the animals is green” message. “More innovation not more animals,” said its ENOUGH “How We’ll Feed The World” campaign, trying to sound like the UN or World Health Organization instead of the Big Pharma company it is. “Simply by using practices available today or already in the pipeline” 747 million tons of feed, 618 billion gallons of water and 388 million acres of farmland a year would be saved, said Elanco.

Non-battery egg systems pose dangers says industry

When it comes to egregious factory farming, the egg industry, with its animal, worker, environmental and consumer abuses is the poster child. Egg operations linked to the egg tycoon Jack DeCoster, for example, were charged with housing workers in cockroach-infested firetrap trailers, hiring children as young as nine, polluting groundwater with bird carcasses, improper asbestos removal and poisoning hundreds with salmonella outbreaks. DeCoster flocks also perished in fires more than once. (DeCoster still managed a gracious retirement.)

At the heart of the egg industry’s abuses are wire “battery” cages which allow each hen less than 67 square inches and in which hens spend their entire lives. Making such cage, in which hens cannot even spread their wings and live among sick, dying and dead cagemates, as Prop. 2 does, illegal is a big step. But the egg industry is fighting back.

Recently, the industry group, the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply, says letting hens move around in non-caged systems called aviary systems is unsafe because it spreads germs, produces dirtier feathers and encourage “cannibalism” or pecking by the birds. Not surprisingly, these are the same arguments used by United EggProducers (UEP), the U.S. egg producer trade group, to defend battery cages in the first place.

Pro battery cage egg farmers with the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply even played the “worker” card—claiming that ammonia concentrations, dust levels and particulate matter emissions were higher in aviaries than batteryXcage systems, threatening workers. Yet a quick look at the egg industry’s history shows their concern for workers is decades late, disingenuous and opportunistic.

The conditions in this migrant farm site are as dangerous and oppressive as any sweatshop we have seen,” said Labor Secretary Robert Reich when he visited DeCoster’s Turner, Maine facility in 1996. “I thought I was going to faint and I was only there a few minutes,” said Cesar Britos, an attorney representing egg workers, when he tried to enter an egg barn. A few years later at same egg operation, law enforcement officers who raided the barns had to be treated for burned lungs from the ammonia levels. Yet the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply says aviary systems harm workers?

Out of state battery egg producers who could no longer ship to California after Prop. 2 because their products were illegal are also fighting back and brought suit. Not only did they challenge the legal authority of California to restrict its egg market to cage-free producers, they claimed that Prop. 2 “will drive up retail prices for eggs over 20 percent.” When threatened with tighter regulations whether truth in labeling or elimination of risky or cruel practices, Big Food usually threatens “higher costs to the consumer.”

But Big Food is also just worried about the health of consumers, it says, certainly not its profits. Disallowing battery egg producers to sell in California would “have a widely disproportionate effect on poorer consumers who depend now on the relatively low cost protein source,” said the battery producer, even claiming that more costly eggs would cause obesity because consumers could not afford the high quality, non-fattening “protein.” While some health voices disagree, most medical professionals link eggs to higher rates of heart disease and stroke and recommend strong dietary limitations.

Antibiotic use is actually getting worse

Recently, the FDA asked Big Ag to voluntarily stop using antibiotics for “growth promotion and feed efficiency” and only use them for “disease prevention” before 2017. But according to the FDA’s 2014 Summary Report on Antimicrobials Sold or Distributed for Use in Food Producing Animals antibiotic use is actually increasing. Domestic cephalosporins sales increased by 57 percent between 2009 through 2014. Use of lincosamide antibiotics like clindamycin increased by 150 percent and dangerous aminoglycoside antibiotics like gentamicin increased by 36 percent. Meat producers are using “disease prevention” as a loophole to continue to administer antibiotics says Scientific American.

While most major U.S. poultry firms have vowed to get human antibiotics out of their chicken products, a 2014 Reuters found that Tyson Foods, Pilgrim’s Pride, Perdue Farms, George’s and Koch Foods are actually using antibiotics “more pervasively than regulators realize” and may be deceiving the public. Koch Foods, a KFCXsupplier, said “We do not administer antibiotics at growth promotion doses” on its web site, but documents from the mills that make its feed to its specifications indicated otherwise, said Reuters. (“I regret the wording” Mark Kaminsky, Koch’s chief financial officer, later told Reuters).

Similarly, Pilgrim’s Pride’s feed mill records show the antibiotics bacitracin and monensin are added “to every ration fed to a flock grown early this year,” to company specifications said Reuters. Tipped off that Reuters had procured the feed mill documents, Pilgrim’s Pride threatened legal action.

Despite Big Food’s contention that antibiotics are not causing antibiotic resistant bacteria, they are rife in conventionally grown U.S. meat.

Almost half of beef, chicken, pork and turkey in samples tested from U.S. grocery stores contained staph bacteria, reported the Los Angeles Times in 2011 — including the resistant MRSA staph bacterium (methicillin resistant S. aureus). Pork tested by Consumer Reports in 2013 also contained MRSA and four other kinds of resistant bacteria.

Resistant strains of Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Hadar, recalled from JennieXO Turkey, Cargill and Schreiber Processing Corporation, were so deadly, officials actually warned that meat being thrown out should be in sealed garbage cans to protect wild animals.

I’ve cared for patients for whom there are no drugs left. It is a feeling of such horror and helplessness,” said Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with alarm about antibiotic resistant bacteria. “We may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics.”

A final irony

There is a final irony in factory farmers’ resistance to safe and humane farming methods that eliminate animal crowding and antibiotics: bird flu. While Big Food hopes you have forgotten by now about the factory farming driven 2015 bird flu epidemic which took the lives of 50 million chickens and turkeys, many have not forgotten including animal and food activists and reporters. Big Food dosed egg layers with carbon monoxide and herded floor reared turkeys and broiler chickens into an enclosed area where they were administered propylene glycol foam to suffocate them. “Ventilation shutdown” was also used which raises the barn temperature to at least 104F for a minimum of three hours killing the flock—a method even factory farmers admit is cruel. “Round the clock incinerators and crews in hazmat suits,” were required for the 2015 bird depopulation reported Fortune.

The bird flu epidemic was reported only as “losses” to farmers and possible price increases not as millions of healthy animals killed for no other reason than to protect farmers’ profits. But bird flu had a perverse positive effect on egg farming reform and the move away from battery cages. As long as their entire flocks were depopulated and their barns were 100 percent empty, factory egg farmers were not as averse at looking at new, non-caged, aviary housing systems…..

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

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#CHEFCJ says Okay, so we thought rosé wine gummy bears were the absolute peak of edible wine innovation NOW Rosé wine chocolate now exists and it’s delish the manufacturers say – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.31: If you have tried this new choccy please leave a comment and let me know .. CJ

Rosé wine chocolate now exists and it’s everything we need

Picture: Compartes)
Yes, yes, yes. (Picture: Compartés)

Okay, so we thought rosé wine gummy bears were the absolute peak of edible wine innovation. Because they’re gummy bears. But also wine. They are genius.

But this tops it. This is beyond genius.

This is rosé wine chocolate.

Delish just brought our attention to the existence of the magical treat, created by chocolate experts Compartés. It’s white chocolate infused with rosé wine and crystalised rose petals, and has a very pleasing candy pink hue.

It’s basically the fanciest version of our Friday night routine of stuffing a Galaxy bar in our mouths between sips of wine.

Picture: Compartés)
(Picture: Compartés)

This chocolate bar is what dreams are made of. This chocolate bar says: ‘Yeah, I’m an adult. An adult with fancy sweet preferences and a dedication to treating myself. ‘Kay?’

This chocolate bar is everything we’ve ever wanted for our future selves, and we are ready for it.

Picture: Compartés)
(Picture: Compartés)

One bar costs $9.95 (£7.52), and yes, Compartés ships worldwide – so we’d recommend buying in bulk to justify any shipping fees.

Oh, and if rosé and rose chocolate slightly exceeds your personal fanciness levels, Compartés also makes Cereal, Birthday Cake, and Donut flavour bars. Whoa…..

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News

#ChefCJ says gives this Lychee Ceviche from Accés in Barcelona a try – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.29: Lychee Ceviche Some dishes stick with you, long after the plate has been cleared.

Fresh Lychee & Snapper Ceviche

This is one such dish: a lychee ceviche from Accés in Barcelona, where we dined during our trip there last spring. It is one of those dishes that promptly imprinted itself on my brain after a single bite and I have not been able to forget.

Shortly after our return, I emailed the restaurant, gushing about how much I enjoyed or meal there and politely asking (ok, subtly begging) for the recipe. Lucky for me (and for you) they were happy to oblige. Granted, there were a few things lost in translation (like the lychees missing from the recipe and something called a ‘rocoto’ which google tells me is a hot red pepper) but I had the basic idea.

Fresh Lychee & Snapper Ceviche

That was over a year ago. Why, you might ask, has it taken me this long to actually make this delightful dish?

Well, it turns out fresh lychees and sushi-grade fish aren’t exactly easy to come by around here. You could use canned lychees, and I have a feeling Accés probably did, however I wanted to do this recipe justice. So I stashed this recipe away until the time was right.

That time is now.

Fresh Lychee Fruit

I stumbled upon a bag of beautiful fresh lychees in one of our local Asian markets a few weeks ago. Upon seeing the spiky pink fruits my eyes lit up and my stomach literally started rumbling. I grabbed a bag and practically skipped out of the store (don’t worry, I paid first) and headed straight for Whole Foods to get some fish.

Read the Rest —Lychee Ceviche

© Love & Olive Oil

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News

PORTSMOUTH(NH): Francesca Fernald has been cooking in the kitchen at Geno’s Chowder and Sandwich Shop for decades, and she treats everybody like family – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.22: Phantom Gourmet: Geno’s Chowder & Sandwich Shop In Portsmouth

It happens to be home – literally the house she grew up in. Back in 1965 her mom converted their home into a spot the locals would frequent for coffee and conversation.

Now you’ll always find Francesca stirring, scooping, stuffing and slicing from behind the counter of this Portsmouth, New Hampshire institution.

“I’m kind of a one person show. I’ve got to see what’s going on, and it allows me to wave over the counter and say hi to people. I enjoy their company and I like to see them coming.”

Located on the back channel of the Piscataqua River, this local favorite has a deck for dining alfresco and a cozy interior that makes you feel like you’re at home.

“It’s very casual. I like to keep the old New England feel,” Francesca said. “It’s almost like going to a general store. You come in; you get a bite to eat; you get the gossip of the town; just good company and comradery, and good food.”

So Phantom settled into the scene in search of THE PERFECT MEAL.

A lobster roll at Geno’s is a must. Since Francesca’s dad was a lifelong commercial fisherman, this is a sandwich her family has been shucking and stuffing for generations.

“We serve three sizes of lobster rolls. I make them all to order,” Francesca explained. “I don’t mix the mayonnaise ahead. You could have it plain; you could have it with mayonnaise; you could have it with butter you could have both. Pretty much any way you like it.”

Jumbo Lobster Roll at Geno's Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Jumbo Lobster Roll at Geno’s Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

“They all come in the same toasted hot dog bun. We put it on the grill, toast it up. You get a nice leaf of lettuce on there. The small lobster roll is two ounces of lobster meat. The middle one is three and a half ounces of lobster meat, and then the jumbo one is five and a half ounces of lobster meat.”

For the ultimate Geno’s experience, order the special, which features a cup of one of their chowders served alongside the Jumbo Lobster roll. The famous chowders are all made according to old family recipes, so ordering at least a cup is definitely a requirement.

“These are New England chowders. They’re the same recipes my mom had when she started. They’re brothy and they’re thin. There’s no thickener in them,” Francesca described.

And there’s no big commitment, because Francesca lets you sample them all before you select.

Lobster Stew at Geno's Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Lobster Stew at Geno’s Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

After you’ve sampled, you may want a good old Clam Chowder made with fresh shucked clams, or the Fish Chowder loaded up with cod and haddock plucked from the waters outside and spiked with potatoes and onions. There’s an Oyster Stew made with whole oysters, milk and butter, and a luxurious Lobster Stew.

“There’s something magical about garlic and butter and white wine and shallots to start something off,” Francesca said. “Then you add lobster meat to it, and it’s done.”

Beyond that, the menu offers everything from Stuffed Quahogs for less than $2, to Salmon Burgers and Crabmeat Salad. But don’t fill up on too much, because Francesca’s homemade desserts are not to be missed. There’s the dense and decadent Raspberry Blackout Brownies, or the moist Carrot Cake smothered with a cream cheese frosting. But nothing beats Francesca’s tried and true recipe for Blueberry Pie.

Blueberry Pie at Geno's Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Blueberry Pie at Geno’s Chowder and Sandwich Shop (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

A Jumbo Lobster Roll, the Lobster Stew, and a slice of Blueberry Pie make for the PERFECT MEAL at Geno’s Chowder & Sandwich Shop.

You can find Geno’s at 177 Mechanic Street in Portsmouth, and online at genoschowder.com.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News

SALEM: If you’re searching for that ultimate summertime spot, this might just be it. Located on hist oric Pickering Wharf overlooking picturesque Salem Harbor, Sea Level Oyster Bar is big, fun, and delicious. It’s what summer in New England is all about – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.18: Phantom Gourmet: Sea Level At Salem’s Pickering Wharf

The two-story, 200 spot boasts gorgeous views from almost every table, whether you’re on the deck, or in the dining room, because Owner George Carey wanted to truly take advantage of the great location.

“When you come to Sea Level, one of the best things is we really celebrate our waterfront, and our location, and being outdoors. We have garage doors that open up to really feel the outside. When you come here, you really are in touch with the harbor; you feel the ocean; you feel the breeze; and it’s done casually. It’s not expensive; it’s not formal. It really is a fun place to have twenty beers on tap, great seafood, and just have a nice, relaxed, casual atmosphere.”

Seafood Tower at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Seafood Tower at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

The menu serves up seafood that’s equal parts fresh and fun, thanks to Executive Chef Jennifer Normant. The first think you see when you step inside is the Raw Bar. To try all it has to offer, a seafood tower is a good choice. It’s stacked with four kinds of oysters, littleneck clams, jumbo shrimp, Jonah crab, and an entire lobster.

If you want to do a little work for your meal, the Peel and Eat Shrimp are steamed in beer and served up hot.

“We add Old Bay seasoning to the pot. We add some shallots, some garlic, some thyme. It’s fun. It’s one of the those down and dirty meals,” Chef Jennifer described.

Another messy masterpiece, and something you’ve probably never seen before, is Sea Level’s Chowder Fries.

Chowder Fries at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Chowder Fries at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

“It’s our version of a poutine,” Jennifer said. “It’s our New England Clam Chowder that we make in house. We add littleneck clams that are steamed. We add some cheddar cheese, and top it with some chives.”

Out of all the appetizers, nothing is more unexpectedly fun than the Popcorn Shrimp, because it really is popcorn and shrimp.

“You’re not getting popcorn shrimp. You’re getting small popcorn shrimp, and you’re getting a bag of popcorn with your popcorn shrimp,” Jennifer explained. “It looks fun. It’s who we are. It’s clever. It’s a play on words. Tastes delicious, because you’re getting Old Bay, and we’re adding it to our popcorn and then you’re eating it with your shrimp.”

'Popcorn Shrimp' at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

‘Popcorn Shrimp’ at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

When it comes to entrees, Sea Level certainly has all the classics covered, like the golden fried Fisherman’s Platter, lightly breaded to let the seafood shine.

“Cod, shrimp, scallops, whole belly clams, onion strings and fries,” Chef Jennifer listed. “It’s definitely enough for two people to share, but you could also be gluttonous and take it and finish it yourself. I guarantee you won’t finish it, because it’s huge, but it’s everything that you would get in New England, all in one bucket.”

Another New England original is the Lobster Bake in a bucket, complete with a pound and a quarter pound lobster, littleneck clams, mussels, chorizo, corn, and grilled potatoes.

Lobster Bake at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Lobster Bake at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

For something a little smaller, there’s a mouthwatering Lobster Roll, served on buttery brioche; Baja Style Fish Tacos with cilantro crema; and a grilled half-pound burger topped with cole slaw and crispy fried clams.

“You’re gonna get the taste of the salty from the ocean from the littleneck clams, and you’re also gonna get a nice juicy burger. Just bite right into it. You want to experience the clams and the burger at the same time. You want to take one big bite,” Jennifer explained.

Burger topped with fried clams at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

Burger topped with fried clams at Sea Level (Image: Phantom Gourmet)

It’s no surprise the seafood at Sea Level is top notch, but they also serve some awesome thin crust pizza. You can get it topped with fried calamari or buttery lobster, but Phantom thinks the best bet is the 3-Way Pizza, Chef Jennifer’s twist on a classic North Shore Roast Beef Sandwich.

“We take fresh sliced tenderloin of beef, put it on the pizza. We put James River barbecue sauce, pepper jack cheese, throw it in the oven. When it comes out we add barbecue sauce, habanero aioli, and crispy onion strings. It’s more fun than a roast beef sandwich, because you’re getting it on pizza. It’s more fun to consume a pizza than it is a roast beef sandwich.”

The fun continues right through the end of your meal, with a dessert menu that’s presented in a whole new way. Servers come around and stamp the menu right on your tablecloth. Chef Jennifer described the standout on that menu, the Twinkie Tiramisu.

“We take the Twinkies and then soak them in espresso and a little bit of sugar; layer it with fresh, creamy mascarpone cheese; and then top with cocoa powder.”

With such fun food and beautiful views, it’s probably time you chart a course for Sea Level.

“It’s just great to come down to the water, to really enjoy the water views, smell the ocean, and have some great seafood,” said George.

You can find Sea Level at 94 Wharf Street in Pickering Wharf in Salem, and online at sealeveloysterbar.com.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment

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How do you dress your dog? July 14 marks National Hot Dog Day! A day where Americans celebrate another slice of their culture – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.14: On National Hot Dog Day, we ask: How do you dress your dog?

Several regions and cities across the country have their own unique hot dog style. Which is your favorite?

Chicago Dog

Chicago Dog (Adri/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)Chicago Dog (Adri/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)

A true Chicago dog is made with Vienna Beef franks, but you’re forgiven if you have to steer off-brand. It’s the toppings that define a Chicago Dog, anyway.

A Chicago Dog is: a steamed beef frank in a poppy seed bun, topped with tomato, white onion, sweet relish, pickled sport peppers, celery salt, yellow mustard and, of course, a dill pickle spear.

Good luck fitting that in one bite.

Detroit Coney

Detroit Coney Dog (VasenkaPhotography/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)Detroit Coney Dog (VasenkaPhotography/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)

There are variations of the Coney all across the Midwest. The preference in Coney dogs between residents of Detroit and Flint, Michigan, is a heated talking point amongst many Michiganders.

One of the most popular is referred to as the Detroit Coney: a beef frank served on a steamed bun and topped with “Coney sauce” – beanless beef chili – mustard, chopped onions and shredded cheddar cheese.

While a fork and knife are frowned upon by some Coney enthusiasts, these dogs have a tendency to make a mess. Ignore any potential sneers and use a fork to clean up the lost Coney sauce and toppings.

New York Dog

New York Dog (Ernesto Andrade/Flickr Commons/CC BY-ND 2.0)New York Dog (Ernesto Andrade/Flickr Commons/CC BY-ND 2.0)

Unlike a Chicago Dog or a Detroit Coney, a New York Dog seems like a reasonable snack to take on the go. It’s not quite the messy behemoth like some other hot dogs.

A classic New York Dog is an all-beef dog, usually griddled, and topped with sauerkraut and mustard. Feel free to ask which local restaurant has the best New York Dog, but do it knowing you’re going to get 100 different answers and 100 different arguments.

Danger Dog (Tijuana Dog)

Danger Dog (Stu Spivack/Flickr Commons/CC BY-SA 2.0)Danger Dog (Stu Spivack/Flickr Commons/CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Danger Dog (believed to be originated in Tijuana, Mexico, and sometimes referred to as a Tijuana Dog) is now a popular staple in California’s big cities and is expanding east.

Unlike the Chicago Dog, the dog and how it is cooked makes the Danger Dog. The DangervDog is a hot dog that is wrapped in bacon and deep fried. Toppings vary from restaurant to restaurant and city to city. One of the most popular ways to top a Danger Dog is grilled onions and peppers, ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise and, of course, bacon bits.

All-American/Un-American Dog

We are calling this the All-American/Un-American Dog. (The Culinary Geek/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)We are calling this the All-American/Un-American Dog. (The Culinary Geek/Flickr Commons/CC BY 2.0)

Let’s be honest, many of us out here aren’t hot dog savants. Whether they are cooked on the grill, over a campfire or on the stove, everyone has their own way to dress a hot dog, usually with the basic fare. But some people have an issue with that. I don’t want to assign labels like “hot dog snob,” but those people exist. For that reason, we are calling this style the All-American/Un-American Dog.

The All-American/Un-American Dog is dressed with whatever you’ve got in the fridge: Ketchup, mustard, onion, pickles and/or relish. Try some hot sauce or maybe sriracha. Potato chips? Sure! Go nuts! Dress it how you like.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

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Something special when the weather is hot so try Ginger Plum Granita with ❤️Love and Olive O il ❤️ – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.02: Ginger Plum Granita // Love and Olive Oil

Ginger Plum Granita with Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

I think there’s something wrong with me.

Just thinking about granita or sorbet or popsicles or anything even remotely ice makes my entire body break out in goosepimples. Like, instantly.

Seriously. It could be eight hundred degrees outside and I’ll still get full body chills at the mere thought of something cold and icy.

It’s like nails on a chalkboard, just thinking about scraping ice and frost and OH MY GOD LINDSAY PLEASE STOP DOING THIS TO YOURSELF YOU’RE MAKING IT WORSE. Go think about hot soup or warm chocolate cake or something because this is torture. Pure torture.

I mean, if I’m going to be covered in chicken skin, I may has well have something to show for it, eh? The chill is worth it if I’m actually digging in to a tart and tangy plum granita and not just sitting here thinking about it.

Ginger Plum Granita with Sugar Plums and Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

Ginger Plum Granita with Sugar Plums and Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

Fresh Sugar Plums, Summer Produce

I spotted these sweet little ‘sugar’ plums at the farmers market last week, and overheard the vendor telling someone else they only had a two week season. Well, twist my arm why don’t you, that’s pretty much the quickest way to get me to buy something.

While they are, indeed, sweet little plums (as their name implies), they aren’t exactly suited to the most common plum recipes out there, you know, the ones that call for perfect slices of pitted plums arranged into rosettes atop a tart crust (for example). Rather, much like my beloved Damsons in the fall (though far sweeter), these guys cling to their pits like a toddler to their binkie, making a clean extraction nearly impossible.

So I tried to think of ways (other than jam, because I’m pretty jammed out at the moment) that I could use these precious plums, and, seeing as we’ve hit summer hard and fast and have the humidity to prove it, something crisp and frozen seemed like the perfect solution.

Read the Rest —Ginger Plum Granita

© Love & Olive Oil

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News