Chef Bryn Williams explores hidden recipe archives in Wales – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Dec.03: Chef Bryn Williams explores recipe archives

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Renowned Welsh chef, Bryn Williams, will be helping to kick off the Explore Your Archive campaign in Wales at Denbighshire Archives in Ruthin Gaol on Friday 18 November 2016

Hailing from Denbigh in North Wales, Bryn Williams learnt to appreciate food and its origins from an early age.

He has worked in some of the most prestigious kitchens in London and is now the Chef Patron of Odette’s, taking over the property in October 2008.

He has also recently opened Bryn Williams at Porth Eirias, a beach-front Bistro, Café & Bar on the North Wales Coast.

As part of this year’s campaign in Wales the focus will be on ‘food’ and a series of short films in English and Welsh have been created featuring historians and archivists looking at nutrition in prisons and workhouses, jam-making and bygone remedies using some weird and wonderful ingredients!

A variety of free events at archives across Wales will be on offer from talks, film-showings, tours and trails to children’s craft activities, story boxes and creative workshops.

Exhibitions on a range of themes will also be on display ranging from textiles, travel and holidays to rugby, railways and tithe maps.

Find Archives Wales on social media – @archiveswales / archifaucymru or visit the website

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#Christmas Dinner for six has increased 14% on last year with the cost of many items from non-discount supermarkets rising above inflation after prices dropped in 2012 that are starting to rise again – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Dec.03: Christmas dinner costs ‘rise 14%’

Analysis shows a typical list of 12 items would come to £64.25 to cater for six people.

That works out at a cost of £10.71 per person compared with £9.41 in 2015.

Separate research by Good Housekeeping found shoppers could get a bargain on Christmas food if they were prepared to shop around.

Prices were affected by uncertainty caused by the UK’s Brexit vote to leave the European Union, as well as normal economic forces as markets readjust following several years of deflation, analysts said.

Analysis by the BBC’s England data unit, using figures provided by mySupermarket, found average prices for turkeys, red wine, potatoes and sprouts have all risen above inflation.

And figures show the cost of a box of crackers has gone up 41% since 2015 with an average box costing about £10.90, compared with £7.73 a year earlier.

Thumbs Up For Croatia’s Secret Truffle Harvest – @AceFoodNews


Thumbs Up For Croatia’s Secret Truffle Harvest
// Croatia, the War, and the Future
Motovun, Croatia

Motovun, Croatia

Joji Sakurai The New York Times/ Australian Financial Review

“Go Nero!”

Truffle hunter Nikola Tarandek urges on his black Labrador, who scratches furiously at the moist soil of Motovun Forest in Croatia.

We are in the hinterlands of Istria, a diamond-shaped peninsula that juts into the Adriatic Sea, exploring one of the richest grounds for premium white truffles – long overshadowed in fame but not quality by the truffle mecca of Alba in the Piedmont region of Italy. Nero has caught the scent at the roots of an oak, sending up clumps of dirt as Tarandek twists a spade into the black earth.

The commotion yields only a tiny tuber not even worth taking back to town. Other truffles that Nero sniffs out turns up spoiled. But it is just the beginning of the season, and within weeks Tarandek, who runs a side-business taking visitors on truffle-hunting tours, will be bringing fist-sized truffles home to market.

Truffles are considered an expensive delicacy in some places, but that is not the case here. And while the Istrian truffle is premium grade, its culture is free of the snobbery, intrigue and astronomical prices found in Piedmont or in the Perigord region of France.

Nikola Tarandek & Nero Photo: NYT

Nikola Tarandek & Nero
Photo: NYT

It’s as if Istrian truffles have been a well-kept secret, ripe for discovery. And that’s beginning to happen with stronger efforts to promote them. The international food world is starting to take notice and visits to Istrian truffle country are increasing every year.

It may seem surprising that a delicacy associated with Italy and France is found in Croatia’s dense oak forests, but truffles have been sought here for centuries. Istrian truffles have maintained a low profile largely because those from Alba enjoy such cachet.

Notovun Truffles Photo: uniline.hr

Motovun Truffles
Photo: uniline.hr

And there’s another reason: Croatian truffles have for decades made their way to the Italian market and been sold as Alba truffles. Locals say that has translated into little incentive to make their product famous, since hunters earn so much supplying Italy in a shady trade made possible by Istria’s proximity to Piedmont.

That’s been changing in the last decade. The night before my truffle hunt I dined at Mondo Tavern in the village of Motovun, which commands spectacular views on a hilltop overlooking the truffle forest.

Mondo Tavern, Motovun, Croatia serves pasta with truffles Photo: NYT

Mondo Tavern, Motovun, Croatia
serves pasta with truffles
Photo: NYT

The owner, Klaudio Ivasic, said locals are awakening to the benefits of keeping truffles at home. Until recent years, Motovun’s tourist season ended in August. As truffle fame has grown, the season is extending through November. “People are coming for the truffles,” Ivasic said proudly.

For travellers, the attractions of an Istrian truffle tour are plentiful. Istria’s rolling landscapes evoke Tuscany; its beaches are among the Mediterranean’s most beautiful; cliffs are dotted with fairytale villages – and a truffle meal won’t burn a hole through your wallet.

At Mondo, a man starts shaving a white truffle over my plate of Istrian “fuzi,” short pasta. I expect him to stop after a couple of seconds, but he keeps going. A heavenly aroma fills the room. The flakes drift down until my pasta is buried in a white truffle mantle. This dish, which in Milan would easily cost €40 ($60) (and in New York or London don’t even think about it), is priced here at a reasonable 155 Croatian kuna ($30).

Croatian/Istrian Pasta with Truffles

Croatian/Istrian
Pasta with Truffles

Ivasic, himself a truffle hunter, says the dry summer and rainy September have been ideal for white truffles, and that this season could be the best in a decade, although “truffles are a mystery”. In the morning, Tarandek is less optimistic, and it’s understandable. He’s been seeking truffles for two hours, to no avail. “Too early in the season,” he mumbles.

Suddenly Nero starts barking frantically by the roots of a poplar. His owner drops to his knees, cutting at roots so his dog can dig deeper. “Come down close to the hole,” Tarandek beckons, “and smell!”

I get down on hands and knees, sinking my face into a muddy crater – just like a truffle-hunting dog – and a blast hit my nose. Is this the jackpot? Tarandek shakes his head. “Oh no, it’s a small truffle,” he says, “but a good one.”

He cuts at roots to extract the puny but precious truffle – and stops. A stream of invective pours from his lips. The yellowish fleck poking from the dirt was only the tip of a much larger prize.

“I have destroyed the truffle,” he groans, displaying the chunk he has broken off. “Ohhhhhh my God. That was sooooo big a truffle!”

Motovun Truffle Photo: NYT

Motovun Truffle
Photo: NYT

Hunters command top dollar only for intact truffles. With one careless flick Tarandek has lost up to €300. But soon he’d seen the brighter side of things, for this meant truffle season was starting in earnest.

“Lucky day,” he says. “Now I have motivation.”

_________

Bon appétit or as Croats say: “Dobar Tek”, everyone!

http://inavukic.com/2016/11/30/thumbs-up-for-croatias-secret-truffle-harvest

EDITOR NOTES: Please share and comment on this with consideration for others please …

Salmonella warning over bagged salad leaves – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Nov.18: Salmonella warning over bagged salad leaves
// The Telegraph
94977356_MAY0069382___Weekend_Gardening___Chris_Tanner_at_the_Barbican_Kitchen_Plymouth_prepares_wit-xlarge_trans++aRL1kC4G7DT9ZsZm6Pe3PSW0qTysEG4yZuBUdXGakjA.jpg

Lead scientist Dr Primrose Freestone, from the University of Leicester’s Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, said: “Salad leaves are cut during harvesting and we found that even microlitres of the juices (less than 1/200th of a teaspoon) which leach from the cut ends of the leaves enabled salmonella to grow in water, even when it was refrigerated.

“These juices also helped the salmonella to attach itself to the salad leaves so strongly that vigorous washing could not remove the bacteria, and even enabled the pathogen to attach to the salad bag container.

“This strongly emphasises the need for salad leaf growers to maintain high food safety standards as even a few salmonella cells in a salad bag at the time of purchase could become many thousands by the time a bag of salad leaves reaches its use by date, even if kept refrigerated.

“Even small traces of juices released from damaged leaves can make the pathogen grow better and become more able to cause disease.”

She said the research, published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, also served as a reminder to consume bagged salad as soon as possible after opening.

“We found that once opened, the bacteria naturally present on the leaves also grew much faster even when kept cold in the fridge,” Dr Freestone added.

As part of the study, plastic bags were cut into 2cm long sections and tested to see how well salmonella formed clinging “biofilms” on their surfaces. The presence of juice enhanced the bug’s ability to attach to the plastic, researchers said.

FEATURED: ‘ The Rise and Fall of French Cuisine ‘ – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Oct.22: You may not like to hear that all great dishes originated in France but many classics that came to the UK did In fact start off life in that country

But now we are being told that The Rise and Fall of French cuisine // Salon
So read and inwardly digest .. Excuse the pun and one day when l am not too busy l will explain my art of cooking from Mrs Beeton to Escoffier and my life and experiences of being a chef and not a cook …. One day … #ChefCJ have a nice day …

woman_restaurant.jpg

Woman in Restaurant

(Credit: Getty/knape)

This piece originally appeared on The Conversation.

In the food world, one of the biggest stories of the last 50 years has been the waning of French culinary authority, the end of a 300-year reign.

In the latest annual ranking of “The World’s Fifty Best Restaurants,” only one French restaurant, Mirazur, appears in the top 10. And its menu reflects modernist (“molecular”) gastronomy – a recent trend of using chemistry in the kitchen – rather than anything associated with traditional French cuisine.

Since the 18th century, France had been equated with gastronomic prestige. The focus of its cuisine has been simplicity, developed as a reaction against medieval reliance on spices; instead of possessing a sharp or sugary taste, its dishes contained butter, herbs and sauces based on meat juices to create a rich, smooth flavor.

The first elegant restaurant in America, Delmonico’s, was founded in New York in 1830 with a French chef, Charles Ranhofer, whose food was considered an exemplar of French tastes and standards. Until the end of the 20th century, the most prestigious restaurants around the world were French, from London’s La Mirabelle to San Francisco’s La Bourgogne.

In 1964, the first New York Times “Guide to Dining Out in New York” listed eight restaurants in its top three-star category. Seven were French. Meanwhile, beginning in 1963, Julia Child’s hugely popular television show “The French Chef” taught Americans how to replicate French dishes in their own kitchens.

So what happened?

In my recently published book, “Ten Restaurants that Changed America,” I show how one restaurant, Le Pavillon, came to epitomize the rise and fall of French cuisine.

Food ‘fit for the gods’

Four of the 10 restaurants featured in my book offer some version of French food. Delmonico’s described itself as French, but it also offered American game and seafood, while inventing dishes such as Lobster Newberg and Baked Alaska. Antoine’s, a New Orleans restaurant that opened in 1840, now portrays its cuisine as “haute Creole,” but it, too, presented itself as French for most of its history.

Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California – the original inspiration for the current farm-to-table vogue – initially tried to imitate a rural French inn before becoming one of the first restaurants in America to promote local food with high-quality, basic ingredients.

But while these restaurants reflect French influence, only one consistently and deliberately imitated Parisian orthodoxy: New York City’s Le Pavillon.

It began as a pop-up-style eatery called “Le Restaurant Français” at the French Pavilion during the New York World’s Fair of 1939-1940. But the sudden German conquest of France in the late spring of 1940 left the staff with a choice: Return to Nazi-occupied France or stay in the U.S. as refugees.

At the New York World’s Fair, the French pavilion had one of the priciest and most popular restaurants: Le Restaurant Francais.
Digital Commonwealth

Maître d’hôtel Henri Soulé, together with those who stayed, found permanent quarters in midtown Manhattan and rebranded it “Le Pavillon.” With a preexisting reputation for excellence from the fair, the restaurant was an instant success.

Le Pavillon and Soulé soon ruled over the city’s restaurant scene, rising to become the undisputed top-ranked establishment in America, with exacting culinary standards that surpassed its Francophile competition. French writer Ludwig Bemelmans thought that Soulé provided not only the finest meals in Manhattan but also eclipsed those in France. In his memoirs, famous food critic Craig Claiborne recalled the food as “fit for the gods,” and a throng of celebrities passed through, from the duke and duchess of Windsor to the Kennedy clan (well, until they quarreled with the irascible Soulé during John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign).

Alongside excellence, a reputation for snobbery

Most high-end American restaurants at the time were opulent but served either French standards such as duck a l’orange or dishes that weren’t particularly French, such as lamb chops.

Le Pavillon’s cuisine, however, was unabashedly pretentious. The more elaborate presentations sent the food writers into raptures: Mousse de Sole “Tout Paris” (sole stuffed with truffles, served with a Champagne sauce and a lobster sauce) or lobster Pavillon (lobster with a complicated tomato, white wine and Cognac sauce).

The menu from Le Pavillon.
hungrygerald

Some of the restaurant’s famous dishes seem rather ordinary by today’s standards. Beluga caviar was (and remains) an expensive delicacy but takes no talent to prepare. Chateaubriand steaks – a tenderloin filet usually served with a red wine reduction or a Bearnaise sauce – routinely exceeded US$100 in today’s dollars. But it takes more skill to select the cut of meat than to prepare and cook it.

Soulé himself missed the bourgeois fare of his homeland such as blanquette de veau or sausages with lentil and, paradoxically, prepared these ordinary dishes as off-menu items for customers who, he felt, could appreciate the real culinary soul of France.

Those special customers were conspicuously favored, and this is an unattractive aspect of Soulé’s legacy. To the extent that French restaurants in America, to this day, retain a reputation for snobbery and annoying social discrimination, it’s largely traceable to Soulé. He didn’t invent “Siberia,” the part of the restaurant that nobodies are exiled to, where service is slack and borderline contemptuous, but he perfected it. He was an exacting proprietor not just to his harried cooks and waiters but to customers as well, disciplining them with a look or, if necessary, harsh words if they questioned his decisions on where they were seated.

The competition for status was not all Soulé’s fault. Joseph Wechsberg, author of a book on Le Pavillon published in 1962, attributed the jockeying for position not to Soulé but rather to a preexisting “battle for survival in the status jungles of Manhattan around the middle of the 20th century.” Even in the supposedly less formal and certainly un-French restaurant scene of today, there is no evidence that sparsely decorated farm-to-table restaurants treat their customers any better than the dictatorial Soulé. Just try getting a reservation at David Chang’s Momofuku Ko in Manhattan’s East Village.

The difference was that the short, stout, charming but awe-inspiring Soulé, whom restaurant critic Gael Greene described as a “flirtatious, five-foot-five cube of amiability,” never pretended to be anything but confidently elitist in running his operation. He routinely referred to himself in the third person and treated his staff in a dictatorial, patronizing fashion. Soulé even defied his landlord’s demand for a better table. When, in response, the rent was exponentially raised, he preferred to move the restaurant rather than give in.

Soulé’s death from a heart attack at the age of 62 in 1966 was marked by adulatory obituaries. Claiborne memorialized him as “the Michelangelo, the Mozart and the Leonardo of the French restaurant in America.” The restaurant staggered on after Soulé, before shutting its doors in 1971.

Today it’s all about globalization and innovation

Following the sudden closing of Le Pavillon, spin-offs – Le Veau d’Or and La Caravalle – would flourish. But if Le Pavillon is now largely underappreciated or even unknown, it is because of the demise of the French model it established: formality and elegance that veered on intimidation.

Even before Soulé’s death, a hint of the new competition had emerged in New York’s Four Seasons. The restaurant, which recently closed, opened in 1959 as a daring anomaly: an elegant, expensive restaurant that was not French but rather international and eclectic in its menu offerings.

Today, grand French cuisine has yielded to Asian and Latin American influence, the rise of Italian cuisine, the cult of local ingredients and the farm-to-table model.

From the 1970s to the 1990s, we witnessed the growing influence of Asian tastes: both specific cuisine (Thai, high-end Japanese) and Asian-European fusions (promoted by chefs such as Jean-Georges Vongerichten). There was also the Italian challenge to French hegemony. Italian cuisine in its American “Mediterranean” form offered simpler, more lightly treated preparations: grilled meat or salads, rather than elaborate, rich sauces.

Over the past decade, we’ve seen the rise of new centers of culinary innovation, whether it’s Catalonia, Spain (where molecular gastronomy was pioneered in the 1990s), or Denmark, where foraging for food and new Nordic cuisine is in vogue.

These days French cuisine seems traditional – and not in a particularly good way. Unfortunately, its association with snobbery only contributed to its demise – a reputation that Henri Soulé did nothing to discourage.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

—-

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I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

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Almond Cake Recipe from Mrs Beatons’ 1887 Household Management Book ‘ – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Sept.25: I personally have this book and it’s a pleasure to provide this recipe for Almond Cake Recipe courtesy of // Love Vintage Recipes

This Almond Cake Recipe is from the Mrs Beaton 1887 Household management book.She has some great recipes in it, and lots of household tips on how to run a home in Victorian Britain 1887. I will be concentrating on the recipes from this book in my next posts. I hope you all enjoy them.
Almond Cake

Almond Cake Recipe 1865

Ingredients–half a pound of sweet almonds, 1 oz of bitter almonds, 6 eggs, 8 tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar, 5 tablespoonfuls of fine flour, the grated rind of 1 lemon, 3 oz of butter.
Method—–Blanch and pound the almonds to a paste; separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs; beat the later, and add to the almonds. Stir in the sugar, flour, and lemon -rind; add the butter, which should be beaten to a cream; and when all these ingredients are well mixed, put in the whites of the eggs, which should be whisked to a stiff froth. Butter a cake mould, put in the mixture, and bake in a good oven from 1 to 2 hours. Enjoy #ChefCJ

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

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There is nothing like Homemade Pita Bread – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Sept.10: I wish as a chef l had more time to post great recipes and articles but just finished a stint on another contract: So here’s one l made earlier and one of my favourites – There is nothing like homemade bread and this is nothing like homemade bread it’s MUCH MUCH BETTER take a look Kitchen Basics: Homemade Pita Bread // Love and Olive Oil enjoy . #ChefCJ

Homemade Pita Bread

Have you ever wondered where the pocket in the pita comes from? I mean, how does it get there?

Magic.

No, really.

Homemade Pita Bread Puffing in the oven

It’s mesmerizing, isn’t it?

Seriously though, I could watch this on repeat all. day. long.

It’s almost as therapeutic as kneading bread dough (big edible stress ball, right? Or maybe that’s just me).

How to Make Homemade Pita Bread

Homemade pita is surprisingly easy, and you’ll be in awe when your flat little pieces of dough magically puff up in the oven like little yeasty clouds. They’re as entertaining to make as they are to eat.

How to Make Homemade Pita Pockets

Homemade pita is like night and day when compared to the stale and flavorless store bought versions. Made with mostly all-purpose flour but with a bit of whole wheat for added texture and flavor (and you can increase the proportion of whole wheat flour too, up to 1 cup, as long as the overall amount of flour stays the same), plus a little bit of honey for added sweetness.

Trust me, the next time you make Gyros or (my favorite) Greek Turkey Tacos, try using homemade pita instead. It only takes a little bit of extra time and is so worth the extra effort.

Get the full recipe and step-by-step instructions on the Kitchenthusiast blog »

Read the Rest —Kitchen Basics: Homemade Pita Bread

© Love & Olive Oil

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

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Fish lovers are facing a price hike due to increased demand, falling global catches and impending legislation to protect sustainability, according to a report from analysts Mintec – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Aug.28: Price of tuna could rocket due to demand and restrictions on fishing

Skipjack tuna is in short supply (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)
Skipjack tuna is in short supply (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)

You may have to pay a little extra for your tuna in the future.

Skipjack prices rocketed this year following a disagreement that stopped US tuna vessels from fishing, which reduced supply.

That meant demand for yellowfin, which is often used as a substitute for skipjack, went up.

Trade magazine The Grocer warned new controls to protect sustainability could mean the cost of tuna rose even further.

‘The new control measures will further limit the current low catches, helping wild tuna stocks recover,’ Mintec analyst Emma-Jayne Smith told the Grocer.

‘This is likely to drive prices higher over the next six months, along with falling catches for alternative tuna species and rising exports to emerging markets.’

The Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission will decide in October if it will issue a temporary ban on tuna fishing in the Eastern Pacific.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

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#ProfitB4People – Our food system is rigged by corporate food industry who are taking desperate steps to fight animal reforms and consumers suffer with lowering of standards for profit – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – Aug.24: Our food system is rigged: How the corporate food industry is taking desperate steps to fight animal reforms

India Monsoon Agriculture

An Indian farmer prepares rice saplings for replanting in a paddy field during monsoon rains on the outskirts of Mumbai, Maharashtra state, India, Tuesday, July 21, 2015. Monsoon rains are crucial for Indian agriculture, because nearly 60 percent of its farmland is rainfed. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool) (Credit: Rafiq Maqbool)

This article originally appeared on AlterNet.

AlterNet

From “battery” cages in egg production to excessive antibiotics, food activists are fighting some of the worst “farm ” practices. California’s Proposition 2, for example, outlawed caged (“battery”) egg production as of 2015. “Just because they are certain to end up on a dinner plate or in a barn producing eggs…doesn’t obviate the need to treat them humanely during their short lives,” read a Prop. 2 LA Times editorial about chickens.

But Big Food is fighting back. Out of state battery egg producers who sold eggs to California that are no longer legal brought suit against Prop 2. When the FDA tried to ban cephalosporin antibiotics, the egg, chicken, turkey, dairy, pork and cattle industries stormed Capitol Hill and won. And now, Big Food is claiming that “aviary”egg systems that replace battery systems are worse — and that antibiotics in egg production are just fine.

Antibiotics are “green” say factory farmers

As AlterNet has reported, more than 70 percent of medically important antibiotics are not used in people but in livestock. They are given to make animals grow faster — less feed is required — and to compensate for overcrowded, unsanitary factory farm conditions, not to treat sick animals. While Big Food and Big Pharma deny it, such routine ag use causes antibiotic resistant bacteria according to every leading medical organization. Superbugs, antibiotic resistant bacteria, hospitalize two million a year in the United States and kill 23,000 according to the CDC.

But wrestling antibiotics out of factory farmers’ hands has been a difficult prospect because they represent huge profits to Big Food and Big Pharma. For example, it took the FDA ten years to get Bayer to quit using dangerous fluoroquinolones in poultry water. And when the FDA tried to ban cephalosporins in 2008, Big Food said it couldn’t “farm” without them.

Now, even though almost all major U.S. poultry producers have pledged to reduce or eliminate antibiotics because of consumer opposition, Sanderson Farms, the country’s third largest poultry producer, says they are just fine. Not only are ag antibiotics not responsible for antibiotic resistant bacteria, says Sanderson, they are downright green and the poultry giant will not eliminate them despite marketing pressure. “We have decided we’re not going to sacrifice our environmental goals, our animal welfare goals or our food safety goals for marketing purposes,” says a new pro-antibiotic ad campaign from Sanderson.

How do antibiotics further Sanderson environmental goals? Without them “we would need more corn, more water, more soybean meal, more housing, more electricity,” because animals couldn’t be crowded together said Lampkin Butts, the Sanderson president and chief operating officer. How do antibiotics further Sanderson animal welfare goals? Without the drugs keeping chickens alive, more would die says Butts.

Calling drug and biotech farming in which more product is squeezed out of each, individual animal “green” is not a new Big Food tactic. Do you remember Monsanto’s recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) which got more milk out of each cow at the price of udder infections, more antibiotics and a shortened life? “Fewer cows means less methane produced by bovine intestinal tracts, and manure production is cut by about 3.6 million tons” per year said a proXrBGH oped. “At the same time, more than 5.5 million gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel (enough to power 8,800 homes) are saved, greenhouse gas emissions are lowered by 30,000 metric tons.”

Two years ago, Elanco, Eli Lilly’s animal division, rolled out a similar “squeezing the animals is green” message. “More innovation not more animals,” said its ENOUGH “How We’ll Feed The World” campaign, trying to sound like the UN or World Health Organization instead of the Big Pharma company it is. “Simply by using practices available today or already in the pipeline” 747 million tons of feed, 618 billion gallons of water and 388 million acres of farmland a year would be saved, said Elanco.

Non-battery egg systems pose dangers says industry

When it comes to egregious factory farming, the egg industry, with its animal, worker, environmental and consumer abuses is the poster child. Egg operations linked to the egg tycoon Jack DeCoster, for example, were charged with housing workers in cockroach-infested firetrap trailers, hiring children as young as nine, polluting groundwater with bird carcasses, improper asbestos removal and poisoning hundreds with salmonella outbreaks. DeCoster flocks also perished in fires more than once. (DeCoster still managed a gracious retirement.)

At the heart of the egg industry’s abuses are wire “battery” cages which allow each hen less than 67 square inches and in which hens spend their entire lives. Making such cage, in which hens cannot even spread their wings and live among sick, dying and dead cagemates, as Prop. 2 does, illegal is a big step. But the egg industry is fighting back.

Recently, the industry group, the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply, says letting hens move around in non-caged systems called aviary systems is unsafe because it spreads germs, produces dirtier feathers and encourage “cannibalism” or pecking by the birds. Not surprisingly, these are the same arguments used by United EggProducers (UEP), the U.S. egg producer trade group, to defend battery cages in the first place.

Pro battery cage egg farmers with the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply even played the “worker” card—claiming that ammonia concentrations, dust levels and particulate matter emissions were higher in aviaries than batteryXcage systems, threatening workers. Yet a quick look at the egg industry’s history shows their concern for workers is decades late, disingenuous and opportunistic.

The conditions in this migrant farm site are as dangerous and oppressive as any sweatshop we have seen,” said Labor Secretary Robert Reich when he visited DeCoster’s Turner, Maine facility in 1996. “I thought I was going to faint and I was only there a few minutes,” said Cesar Britos, an attorney representing egg workers, when he tried to enter an egg barn. A few years later at same egg operation, law enforcement officers who raided the barns had to be treated for burned lungs from the ammonia levels. Yet the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply says aviary systems harm workers?

Out of state battery egg producers who could no longer ship to California after Prop. 2 because their products were illegal are also fighting back and brought suit. Not only did they challenge the legal authority of California to restrict its egg market to cage-free producers, they claimed that Prop. 2 “will drive up retail prices for eggs over 20 percent.” When threatened with tighter regulations whether truth in labeling or elimination of risky or cruel practices, Big Food usually threatens “higher costs to the consumer.”

But Big Food is also just worried about the health of consumers, it says, certainly not its profits. Disallowing battery egg producers to sell in California would “have a widely disproportionate effect on poorer consumers who depend now on the relatively low cost protein source,” said the battery producer, even claiming that more costly eggs would cause obesity because consumers could not afford the high quality, non-fattening “protein.” While some health voices disagree, most medical professionals link eggs to higher rates of heart disease and stroke and recommend strong dietary limitations.

Antibiotic use is actually getting worse

Recently, the FDA asked Big Ag to voluntarily stop using antibiotics for “growth promotion and feed efficiency” and only use them for “disease prevention” before 2017. But according to the FDA’s 2014 Summary Report on Antimicrobials Sold or Distributed for Use in Food Producing Animals antibiotic use is actually increasing. Domestic cephalosporins sales increased by 57 percent between 2009 through 2014. Use of lincosamide antibiotics like clindamycin increased by 150 percent and dangerous aminoglycoside antibiotics like gentamicin increased by 36 percent. Meat producers are using “disease prevention” as a loophole to continue to administer antibiotics says Scientific American.

While most major U.S. poultry firms have vowed to get human antibiotics out of their chicken products, a 2014 Reuters found that Tyson Foods, Pilgrim’s Pride, Perdue Farms, George’s and Koch Foods are actually using antibiotics “more pervasively than regulators realize” and may be deceiving the public. Koch Foods, a KFCXsupplier, said “We do not administer antibiotics at growth promotion doses” on its web site, but documents from the mills that make its feed to its specifications indicated otherwise, said Reuters. (“I regret the wording” Mark Kaminsky, Koch’s chief financial officer, later told Reuters).

Similarly, Pilgrim’s Pride’s feed mill records show the antibiotics bacitracin and monensin are added “to every ration fed to a flock grown early this year,” to company specifications said Reuters. Tipped off that Reuters had procured the feed mill documents, Pilgrim’s Pride threatened legal action.

Despite Big Food’s contention that antibiotics are not causing antibiotic resistant bacteria, they are rife in conventionally grown U.S. meat.

Almost half of beef, chicken, pork and turkey in samples tested from U.S. grocery stores contained staph bacteria, reported the Los Angeles Times in 2011 — including the resistant MRSA staph bacterium (methicillin resistant S. aureus). Pork tested by Consumer Reports in 2013 also contained MRSA and four other kinds of resistant bacteria.

Resistant strains of Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Hadar, recalled from JennieXO Turkey, Cargill and Schreiber Processing Corporation, were so deadly, officials actually warned that meat being thrown out should be in sealed garbage cans to protect wild animals.

I’ve cared for patients for whom there are no drugs left. It is a feeling of such horror and helplessness,” said Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with alarm about antibiotic resistant bacteria. “We may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics.”

A final irony

There is a final irony in factory farmers’ resistance to safe and humane farming methods that eliminate animal crowding and antibiotics: bird flu. While Big Food hopes you have forgotten by now about the factory farming driven 2015 bird flu epidemic which took the lives of 50 million chickens and turkeys, many have not forgotten including animal and food activists and reporters. Big Food dosed egg layers with carbon monoxide and herded floor reared turkeys and broiler chickens into an enclosed area where they were administered propylene glycol foam to suffocate them. “Ventilation shutdown” was also used which raises the barn temperature to at least 104F for a minimum of three hours killing the flock—a method even factory farmers admit is cruel. “Round the clock incinerators and crews in hazmat suits,” were required for the 2015 bird depopulation reported Fortune.

The bird flu epidemic was reported only as “losses” to farmers and possible price increases not as millions of healthy animals killed for no other reason than to protect farmers’ profits. But bird flu had a perverse positive effect on egg farming reform and the move away from battery cages. As long as their entire flocks were depopulated and their barns were 100 percent empty, factory egg farmers were not as averse at looking at new, non-caged, aviary housing systems…..

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

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#CHEFCJ says Okay, so we thought rosé wine gummy bears were the absolute peak of edible wine innovation NOW Rosé wine chocolate now exists and it’s delish the manufacturers say – @AceFoodNews


#AceFoodNews – July.31: If you have tried this new choccy please leave a comment and let me know .. CJ

Rosé wine chocolate now exists and it’s everything we need

Picture: Compartes)
Yes, yes, yes. (Picture: Compartés)

Okay, so we thought rosé wine gummy bears were the absolute peak of edible wine innovation. Because they’re gummy bears. But also wine. They are genius.

But this tops it. This is beyond genius.

This is rosé wine chocolate.

Delish just brought our attention to the existence of the magical treat, created by chocolate experts Compartés. It’s white chocolate infused with rosé wine and crystalised rose petals, and has a very pleasing candy pink hue.

It’s basically the fanciest version of our Friday night routine of stuffing a Galaxy bar in our mouths between sips of wine.

Picture: Compartés)
(Picture: Compartés)

This chocolate bar is what dreams are made of. This chocolate bar says: ‘Yeah, I’m an adult. An adult with fancy sweet preferences and a dedication to treating myself. ‘Kay?’

This chocolate bar is everything we’ve ever wanted for our future selves, and we are ready for it.

Picture: Compartés)
(Picture: Compartés)

One bar costs $9.95 (£7.52), and yes, Compartés ships worldwide – so we’d recommend buying in bulk to justify any shipping fees.

Oh, and if rosé and rose chocolate slightly exceeds your personal fanciness levels, Compartés also makes Cereal, Birthday Cake, and Donut flavour bars. Whoa…..

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News